MO_Space: A Mubble in a Pubble / IN THE DARK
Apr
27
to May 26

MO_Space: A Mubble in a Pubble / IN THE DARK

A Mubble in a Pubble
Yasmin Sison


A spirit of boundless play permeates Yasmin Sison’s A Mubble in a Pubble, brought by a wide variety of works that seem to have spilled out of a child’s toy box.

With a takeoff from Ruth Krauss’ classic 1950s children’s book I Can Fly, where a young girl asserts how she can be anything she wants to be: “A cow can moo, I can too…Pitter pitter pat, I can walk like a cat,” Sison allows others to participate in her process with dialogues of freedom and looseness; color and form; softness and hardness; and abstraction and figuration, made tactile by collages meant to be finished by viewers, as well as movable paintings and sculptures.

Together with shaped objects, fabric works, and paintings, Sison continues to cherish childlike wonder, and at the same time encourages her viewers to play alongside her, to fly with their imagination, to recapture that part of every person that only needs their intuition to overcome limitations.

– Koki Lxx


IN THE DARK
Gail Vicente


It is hard to tell where reality ends and illusion begins. Exploring the paths that connect our inner and outer sights, the exhibition records the transitions that take place during a specific biorhythmic setting. Within this zone, activities like automatic painting, meditating, forming new habits manifest. Exercises were made on translating something hard to translate such as an aura in painting, visual vibrations, and the awareness that a moment passes with every stroke. Projecting these visions is like going on a trip. Take a moment to reflect on the things that are not there physically. Make sure you are not echoing old tricks to get new results. Look for a link, a crack, a gap; look for that space where reality and illusion blends and separates.

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Silverlens: Primary Drives
Apr
27
to May 25

Silverlens: Primary Drives

Primary Drives
Lou Lim, Issay Rodriguez, Gary Ross Pastrana, & Maria Taniguchi

SILVERLENS is pleased to bring together four contemporary voices from the Philippines. Young and emerging artists Lou Lim and Issay Rodriguez alongside established and respected artists Gary-Ross Pastrana and Maria Taniguchi in Primary Drives.

All four artists have exhibited prior at SILVERLENS. In 2017, Lim exhibited Horizon and Rodriguez exhibited “…”, both their first solo exhibitions in the gallery. Having worked with SILVERLENS for over a decade, this will be Gary-Ross Pastrana’s 11th, and Taniguchi’s 10th, exhibitions in the gallery.

For the exhibition Primary Drives, three objects designated as columns exist in addition to the artists’ own works. Initially thought of as quasi-architecture, and not, strictly speaking, as collaborative work, these function simply as physical manifestations of a starting point. Anti-void, and inversely supra-void, the columns release the pressure to fill space, or to seek direct associations between the works in the exhibition. Thus, they can exist as architectural and utilitarian objects at full scale, made of wood, metal, cement. They can exist as traces in pencil, paint, sticker, wire; or as outlines in string, or other gossamer, light material fitted on an armature, fragile, so that only intentions occupy space. The columns, in the end, signal the possibility of an exhibition space as a discursive entity alongside its usual function in the display and framing of artwork. And as such, do more than their function to prop up structures and spaces. The phenomenology of these columns, of which the final form is undecided until the making of the exhibition itself, is what contextualises the four artist’s works.

Lou Lim focuses her investigations into the processes of painting and sculpture. Adopting the method of printmaking, the surface of a painting of a cloud-filled sky is cast with silicone, its result used as a matrix to imprint a copy of the painting’s strokes onto a new surface. From a section of sky seen, photographed, painted, cast, and printed, these series of transformations and their outcomes draw focus towards the activity of expressing the momentary and the immaterial in relation to materiality and the notions of permanence.

Gary-Ross Pastrana’s sculptural, object-based work are, for the artist, ‘realised’ prototypes - half artwork, half device for working out the problems and intricacies of new ideas. Having developed a rigorous practice in which his concerns often are dealt with in artistic projects that combine the quotidian and conceptual, in this new series of works the artist seeks to reorient himself in order to address new visibilities, in particular the various visual phenomena of digital information.

Issay Rodriguez’s series of cyanotypes and negatives depict the transience of memory despite the existence of photography. Images salvaged from old photographs are arranged along a wall, separated by gaps that the artist characterises as lost time. These abstract approaches to photography not only highlight the tactility of an image in the digital age but also serves as the artist’s own take on Ãoebermalte Fotografien' (Gerhard Richter’s “that’s a mouthful”) where painting and photography meet.

Maria Taniguchi’s quasi-abstract paintings propose an expanded idea of the self within an expanded notion of painting. Process-oriented and time-based, the paintings possess subtle architectural and sculptural qualities. In the work, accumulative, serial labor is what facilitates the entanglement of body and object over time. Outlined in pencil, the rectangular cells are individually painted. Viewed closely, the cells look decidedly non-mechanical, with distinct tonal variations and irregularities.

-Maria Taniguchi

Primary Drives is on view from 27 April to 25 May 2019 at SILVERLENS, 2263 Don Chino Roces Avenue Extension, Makati City. For inquiries on this show, contact info@silverlensgalleries.com or +63917 587 4011.

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Galerie Stephanie: Hemline: Unholy Duty / Terraforming Rituals
Apr
27
to May 11

Galerie Stephanie: Hemline: Unholy Duty / Terraforming Rituals

Hemline: Unholy Duty
Sarah Geneblazo

Sarah Geneblazo is a graduate of the University of the Philippines College of Fine Arts, Major in Visual Communication, and is the current President of Neo Angono Artists Collective Inc. Her works narrate her personal experience with childhood trauma; a therapeutic art process towards healing. She was a finalist in the PLDT -DPC National Art Competition in 2010, and placed first in the Department of Agrarian Reform Mural Painting Contest in 2006 in Lipa City, Batangas, the prize of which helped her pay her tuition during her first year in UP Diliman. She has showcased her work abroad and in Art Fair Philippines 2016, as well as local art galleries Galerie Stephanie, Blanc Gallery, West Gallery and J Studio.


Terraforming Rituals
Kat Grow

Time is the catalyst that allows art to come out of the labor that must be mustered to accomplish the task. Kat Grow presents her first solo exhibition “Terraforming Rituals” with works on paper and a sculptural installation, where she allows herself to become the conduit between the earth and art - a worker for a master that has watched since the dawn of mankind.

Grow graduated from the University of the Philippines majoring in Painting, and has joined group exhibitions at Kaida Contemporary, Artery Art Space, and Sining Kamalig, as well as displayed works at the NCCA Gallery and the Erehwon Art Center. A multidisciplinary artist, Kat has taught various workshops on charcoal, pastel, ink, watercolor, and oil painting, and has won the Sculpture Category Grand Prize Winner in the 46th Shell National Student Art Competition. In 2014 she was awarded the Artery artist-run space Mentorship Program.

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1335Mabini: City of Bawal
Apr
27
to Jun 8

1335Mabini: City of Bawal

City of Bawal
Brisa Amir, Datu Arellano, Kristoffer Ardena, Jan Balquin, Lesley-Anne Cao, Miggy Inumerable, Czar Kristoff, Celine Lee, Cris Mora, Indy Paredes, Mark Salvatus, Jel Suarez, & Jose Tong


No jaywalking. No trespassing. No littering. No loitering. No loading and unloading. No parking. No U-turn. No texting and driving. No drinking and driving. No entry. No guns allowed. No smoking. No illegal vendors. Not for hire. Post no bill. Do not blow horn. Obey speed limit. Do not delay. Obey god. Slow down. Bite me. Gago, call me!

How to grasp the everyday minutiae of the city of bawal?

Someone discarded a slipper on the street. Did she or he return home on one bare foot? What will happen to the discarded slipper? A pothole is so wide and deep, can it swallow an automobile or dead bodies whole? An ambulance is stuck in traffic, who prays for the passenger-patient to reach the hospital in time? Why do security guards yield shotguns? Do they ever have to draw their weapons? Why does it smell like piss right next to the bawal umihi signage? Who is the ‘we’ in the neon 'in god we trust'? Who writes of revolt and revolution on the city’s walls? Who reads these messages? How to respond?

The city of bawal – the seemingly trivial and futile, the fragments… Can bawal be made to stutter? And open bawal up to a different realm, an othered realm of perplexing possibilities. This becoming, stuttering becoming, is set in the messy, mesmerizing, chaotic, cacophonic city – Metro Manila that is.

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Blanc Gallery: Enclosure / Concrete Nest / Alongside Maya
Apr
6
to Apr 27

Blanc Gallery: Enclosure / Concrete Nest / Alongside Maya

Enclosure
Dino Gabito

ENTERING THE “ENCLOSURE” OF DINO GABITO
By Cid Reyes

One of the breakthrough concepts in modern sculpture is what was called “wrapping art,” a phrase describing the works of the Bulgarian-American artist Christo Javacheff, whose objects, or subjects, have been wrapped to conceal what was purportedly never to be seen, or indeed, previously seen, such as his monumentally ambitious projects of wrapping the Pont Neuf in Paris (1985) and the Reichstag in Berlin (1971-1995).  But conceived even earlier, however, was a work by the Paris-based American artist Man Ray, who in 1920, presented “The Enigma of Isidore Ducasse,” a “sculpture” that concealed within the enveloping blanket a sewing machine.

In painting, the Chilean Claudio Bravo painted in Hyper-realist style images of wrapped objects, which by their shapes, were suggestive of framed paintings. For the viewer, the sheer absurdity of having to look and stare, wondering at what may be the object of concealment, would seem like an exercise in futility.

Tradition of Concealment

Filipino artist Dino Gabito follows this tradition of concealment, of keeping his subjects out-of-sight, veiled, draped over. His first solo show was appropriately titled “Shroud:  Ides of March (2015).” A length of cloth often used for wrapping a lifeless body, a shroud is a word which, till today, retains its morbid emotional resonance, in particular,  from the so-called “Shroud of Turin,” purportedly the burial cloth of Christ, a matter still considered debatable. The subtitle, however, was derived from the famous quote “Beware the Ides of March,” from Shakespeare’s tragedy “Julius Caesar.” It was uttered by a soothsayer, warning the Roman emperor that his life was in danger.

Transfiguring Attraction

Intriguingly, the allusion to the death of Julius Caesar may really be instructive of Gabito’s obsessive and transfiguring attraction with the art of drapery, as witness the many paintings depicting the event, for instance, in the works of Vincenzo Camuccini, Jean Leon Jerome, Tancredi Scarpelli, and others. In these magisterial Old Master paintings, a splendid cascade of drapery is arrayed in the figures of the ancient Roman senators robed in a toga, draped over the shoulder and flowing loosely over the body.

“Assistant of Character”

The history of drapery in art dates back to the ancient Egyptian hieratic paintings, characterized by the unrelieved stiffness of lines. In contrast, Greek art, mainly sculpture, was richly resplendent in the use of drapery with their soft, windblown contours hugging and clinging to the body, by turns covering and revealing it. Down through the centuries, Leonardo da Vinci prodigiously did drawings and paintings of draped figures, as did Raphael, whose drapery was “the assistant of character,” and Michelangelo whose drapery “envelopes grandeur,” and Peter Paul Rubens, whose drapery was “the ponderous robe of pomp.” Even Cezanne could not resist to cradle his still lifes of apples within the fold of drapery, coaxed to remain in shape with the use of strategically placed coins and stones concealed underneath the fabric.

Trompe L’oeil

What distinguishes then this Filipino artist’s terrain of drapery? For Gabito, drapery is essentially an abstract image, a fertile and generous resource of illusion in the service of trompe l’oeil, the art of fooling the eye. His adapted practice, however, of draping the cloth over a hidden body inevitably engages a figurative and poignant reading of his images. The “Shroud” paintings of Gabito, for instance, were not of those belonging to the dead. Indeed, his concealed subjects were in fact suggestive of living, breathing humans.

Artist-Actor-Director

What Gabito did not conceal, though, was that he was his own model for all the bodies. While the artist could have hired some “body” to physically occupy the space behind the cloak, it was more practical for the artist himself to “embody” a persona, as it were, not unlike the appearance – in this case, the “non-appearance” of a dramatis personae – who could convey through choreographic contortions and angularities of the visage, the torso, the limbs and extremities       specific dark emotions such as grief, devastation, despair, and sorrow.  

The whole scenario was then one of a triple projection of the artist as actor as director. With all its theatrical fervor, Gabito unwittingly stepped into the stagey realm of “The Theater of the Absurd,” where, for instance, an actor, abruptly out of character, would address the startled audience, thus breaking the illusion of “the fourth wall”

To be sure, Gabito could have withheld this bit of information from the audience so as to deepen the “mystery” of the apparition, but that, as we say, was the artist’s “call”. (It reminds us of National Artist BenCab’s disclosure that in his painting titled “Flag,” beneath the country’s rumpled tri-color was in fact his wife Caroline Kennedy. He needed, he said, to give volume and body to the Philippine flag.)

Evocative Specificity

Succeeding shows titled “Ignore the Noise”(2015) and “Duplicity” (2017) were, by the evocative specificity of their titles, foregrounded  paradoxical and psychological states, illuminations of human frailty and anxieties, revealed – or intensely felt, through the porous exhalation of the hidden figures, ghost-like, underneath the stultifying sheets.

Undiluted Gorgeousness

In the current show titled “Enclosure,” now on view at the Blanc Gallery, Gabito has banished the human figure underneath – even the artist had to come up for air! What had replaced the figure instead is an object steeped in practicality:  a serviceable, nondescript clothes hanger stand. Or indeed, a box – an unremarkable featureless vessel. Within and behind these languorously draped vessels is an enclosed space: unmoved and immovable air, a nesting alcove for the spirit.  As a box is a three-dimensional object, so is Gabito’s painting an illusion of a three dimensional reality.

These recent works subscribe to the counsel of the American artist John French Sloan, a founder of the Ashcan School: “A piece of drapery is like a necktie, hot stuff to paint, and one of the easiest things for a painter to kid himself into thinking he can do. Don’t be fooled by the color. Go after the shape and character. Hew the focus together with colored tones.” Not only did Gabito drain his works of color, he lavished on these works the seductive tones of light, surface, and volume. Gabito courts a virtuosic display of skill, technique, and draftsmanship, eschewing such previous human concerns of presence and absence, identity and selfhood.

Working with patience and precision, he artfully hung his sheets of canvas – lifeless as material, yes, but lifelike in a way that they surrendered themselves to the real demands of weight, volume, and gravity. The modelling of light and shadow – stark blacks, white, and grays, and its infinite modulations – absorb and countervail each other, with an almost rhythmic alternation, undeterred by the formlessness of structure, being simply a relentless cascading of material, a continuously descending motion, undifferentiated by any pattern or detail, and a virtually unrelieved verticality. But even then, despite their frank materiality, and against all artist’s intention, they still seem to solicit spiritual qualities, incorporeal intensities, optical presences.

A Space for the Spirit

To be sure certain viewers habituated to figurative readings may insist on viewing these works as “crucifixion” figures, with their outstretched arms suggestive of the Christ hanging on the cross. But that is par for the course. What is concealed in enclosed space is perversely, curiously,  what the human eye seeks to see.

In Dino Gabito’s “Enclosure”, we enter a realm in which within an enclosed space we may commune with the spirit.

Cid Reyes is the author of choice of National Artists Arturo, BenCab, J. Elizalde Navarro, and Napoleon V. Abueva. A prolific writer, he has written over thirty art books and numerous art reviews. He studied Painting at the Academy of Fine Arts in Rome, Italy, and Art History at the City Institute in London, England. Reyes received a Best in Art Criticism Award” from the Art Association of the Philippines (AAP). In 2015, he was recipient of the “Most Outstanding Kapampangan in the Arts” (MOKA) Award from the Province of Pampanga.


Concrete Nest
Dale Erispe

Dale Erispe’s fascination with nature and tales of its encounter with human presence across time takes him to another curious turn for his solo exhibition: the appropriation of a certain human behavior and translating this into an imagined ecology highlighting the formal and symbolic aspects of plant life. He still employs the usual elements he is most adept with in painting, such as greeneries contrasted with infrastructure or architecture, but this time deviates from visualizing the conflict between the natural and  the  man-­‐made.  He  proposes  instead  an  alternative  reality  where  an  anti-­‐social  condition  seen  in humans becomes a nurturing environment ideal to growth and blossoming in another life form.

The works, consisting of paintings and sculptural pieces, center on the image of a tree and explore the variety of forms emerging from its natural growth. He pictures the trees as being sited though in an odd environment—confined indoors or in small enclosures—a setting seemingly unfavorable to its survival. Yet, the trees thrive beautifully, each one displaying its lush, unique form. The inspiration comes from the Japanese concept of hikikomori, a state of extreme isolation from the outside world and social withdrawal. In this exhibition, such condition unexpectedly becomes conducive and allows life to flourish, a reversal which the artist uses to imply the importance to an individual of seeking solitude and refuge. The barrier or shield which shuts off the individual may in fact be a protective bubble from the harsh elements of social life, providing a recluse that brings out the best of one’s abilities and uniqueness. 

Curated by Ruel Caasi and in collaboration with The Working Animals Art Projects


Alongside Maya
John Marin

The art of John Marin has been taking a great deal of inspiration from Eastern spiritual and philosophical traditions, exploring the visual possibilities  in  the  wealth  of  wisdom  emerging  from  these  traditions  while incorporating his own interpretations of their resonance in contemporary society. His sustained engagement with these philosophies has also brought him to navigate a terrain dealing with  issues  of identity, the individual’s internal struggles, the burdens and baggage of existence, and  seeking  life’s  purpose, among many others. In this solo exhibition, he converses with  the  Vedic  concept  maya,  an  illusion created by the magical powers of divinities which obstructs a human’s encounter with reality. Using this concept as a central theme, he presents a creative take on the  age-­‐old reflection about the illusory  nature  of  human perception.

He comes up with portraits that emphasize the eyes as windows to the truth. In the compositions, the field surrounding the eyes is littered with distractions in the form of chaotic tangling of strokes, creating a blurry plane only cleared around the subject’s vision. The individuals in the portraits seem to be  peeking through holes, their piercing gazes becoming invisible forces that penetrate the layer of mesh that renders them partially hidden from the viewer. With this intervention, the artist looks back to the association of the sense of sight to notions of truth, reality, illusion, and deceit, both in the visual and philosophical sense. Each portrait may speak about mediated forms of encountering and experiencing the world, be it through the handiwork of deities or spiritual forces, or through the lens of today’s technologies. These impediments from reality are bound to be transcended only by an extraordinary vision or a sharp, critical eye.

Curated by Ruel Caasi and in collaboration with The Working Animals Art Projects

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West Gallery: Me, Cy and M. Chagall Down by the Schoolyard / Concrete Evidence / Real Eyes Realize Real Lies / A Class Without A Teacher
Apr
4
to May 4

West Gallery: Me, Cy and M. Chagall Down by the Schoolyard / Concrete Evidence / Real Eyes Realize Real Lies / A Class Without A Teacher

Gallery 1
JONATHAN OLAZO:
Me, Cy and M. Chagall Down by the Schoolyard

Gallery 2
VAN TUICO:
Concrete Evidence

Gallery 3
LINDSLEE:
Real Eyes Realize Real Lies

Gallery 4
JOSE GUILLERMO NAVAL:
A Class Without A Teacher

Exhibitions run until May 4 2019

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Silverlens: Zero Infinite / Continuing Growth
Mar
23
to Apr 17

Silverlens: Zero Infinite / Continuing Growth

Zero Infinite
Chati Coronel, Bernardo Pacquing, & Jose Santos III

Silverlens presents three important mid-career artists for the first show post-Art Fair Philippines: Bernardo Pacquing, Jose Santos III, and Chati Coronel. The choice of the timing this show after the art tsunami that is AFP is deliberate, a doorbell to audiences that exhibitions happen at the galleries all year round.  A reminder that the magic of art happens at these long-form exhibitions when artists, like icebergs, simultaneously dazzle on the surface and reach deep into the abyss. 

The show perhaps should be called ‘Infinite, Zero, Infinite’ pertaining to the middle number that zero stands for. On either side of it, are an infinity at the positive or at the negative. Mathematically, these are unconnected—zero is a number; infinity is a concept you can never reach.

For this show, Jose Santos III chose Bernardo Pacquing, Bernardo Pacquing chose Chati Coronel. Santos and Pacquing were first, and last, together shown at the Cultural Center of the Philippines Thirteen Artist Award in 2000, the millennium bug year. Coronel’s pieces float in and out of Pacquing’s consciousness, like spirit pieces reflected on months after their encounter. A conversation over studio visits among the artists revealed common interests in the beginnings of their processes, in the endless inquiries presented by specifics. Inquiries that can go either side into positive or negative: x-axis or y-axis. Or Z axis even!

Zero is the measure of nothing, of having no quality; infinity, we use to describe the process of doing something forever. Zero is a definite presence; infinity is an approach. Diagrammatically, their symbols are the same, an unbroken but connected line, but twists of each other.

The twist is what we are interested in. When does something become art? When do materials rise above their humble parts to become more than their sum? When Pacquing ratchets together hard and soft objects to form impossible but consummate unions; when Coronel paints layers on layers of color and text to reveal a final figure that was there from the beginning; and when Santos builds assemblages into cascading packets of the national psyche.

Philosophically, they present a way of working— a perpetual beginning, an indivisible source, the perfect unknown.

- Isa Lorenzo


Continuing Growth
Tessy Pettyjohn

SILVERLENS is pleased to announce Continuing Growth, Tessy Pettyjohn’s first solo exhibition in the gallery. A renowned pioneer of Philippine pottery, Pettyjohn’s ceramic works are often inspired by the flowers and plants in her garden.

Tessy’s exploration into nonfunctional clay forms began some years ago. Her first exhibitions were about architecturally inspired structures and were mostly simple geometric forms, which is no surprise given that she originally wanted to study architecture before she was convinced to take up painting at UP Fine Arts. Her interest in painting eventually evolved into a new direction: ceramics. For the past 40 years, she and her husband Jon have been pioneering the path for a whole generation of studio potters.

Beginning with her exhibit Cornucopia in 2001 she moved in a new direction. During a snorkeling experience in Palawan she was struck by the diversity and complexity of life underwater -- not just sheer beauty and color but also by the repetitive patterns and structure growing out of the corals, rocks, and sea floor. In the following years she studied and absorbed natural form from other sources such as cacti, succulents, flowers, and grasses. This produced 3 consecutive solo exhibitions: Cornucopia, My Garden, and Aianthous. In all of these exhibitions growth and pattern were her main concern.

Pettyjohn’s choice materials are stoneware and porcelain. These clays, often favored by modern potters, require high temperature firing and produce an amazing range of colors and textures, not unlike those found in nature. They can convey both the biological (such as cacti and coral), and geological (stones and landscape), as stoneware is coarse and earthy, and porcelain fine and colorful. They are opposites in a way.

The common thread in all these exhibits, apart from pattern and color, was the way the structures appeared or blossomed out of another simpler form like a stem or a vase or sometimes the cover of a jar. She was still interested in the vestiges of function; however, it was the contrast that seemed to appeal. Complex form and color appearing from plain lifeless surfaces and finding a sort of niche; porcelain appearing out of stoneware.

For Continuing Growth, she has stepped a little further beyond the progression and has moved away from the vases; the growths appear out of simpler forms that could be biological, geological, or even man-made, as though the vegetation begins to appear in the detritus of an abandoned world. “Life will find a way” as the mathematician Ian Malcolm said in Jurassic Park. The patterns are now moving up the wall. Although the artist says this might be the last show in the series it will be interesting to see if she moves even further away down the road to abstraction in coming shows.

- Jon Pettyjohn

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Art Fair Philippines 2019
Feb
22
to Feb 24

Art Fair Philippines 2019


ART FAIR PHILIPPINES 2019
22-24 February | 10am - 9pm
The Link, Ayala Center, Makati

Founded in 2013, Art Fair Philippines is the premier platform for exhibiting and selling the best in modern and contemporary Philippine visual art. The fair aims to mirror the vibrant local art scene and continue to generate support for Filipino art practitioners. Set in an alternative urban venue, Art Fair Philippines makes art accessible to enthusiasts and to those who want to discover one of Southeast Asia’s most exciting art landscapes.

Philippine Art Events, Inc. oversees the management of Art Fair Philippines.

The event is co-presented by Ayala Land, Bank of the Philippine Islands, Globe Platinum, and Julius Baer.

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10 Days of Art: The Ministry of Contemporary Art: Giorgio Guglielmino, AKA Italian Ambassador to the Philippines on Art
Feb
18
6:00 PM18:00

10 Days of Art: The Ministry of Contemporary Art: Giorgio Guglielmino, AKA Italian Ambassador to the Philippines on Art

Special Events | The Ministry of Contemporary Art: Giorgio Guglielmino, AKA Italian Ambassador to the Philippines on Art
Feb 18, 6PM | Manila House Private Members Club

The diplomat is also a writer. The author of several books on art, the latest being This is Now - A Geographical Guide to Cutting-Edge Contemporary Art (2013) talks about his abiding interest in contemporary art and how his diplomatic career has helped to cultivate this passion.

Guest: P500

Celebrate the best in Philippine contemporary art for 10 days with our partners all around the city!

10 DAYS OF ART
Feb 15 - 24, 2019
www.10DaysofArt.com

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10 Days of Art: Juxta: Position, The Aesthetics of Reduction
Feb
16
to Mar 2

10 Days of Art: Juxta: Position, The Aesthetics of Reduction

Exhibition Opening | Juxta: Position, The Aesthetics of Reduction
Asian Art: Future, 1335MABINI
Feb 16 - Mar 2, 4PM | 1335 Mabini Karrivin Plaza, Chino Roces Ave. Extension, Makati City

Celebrate the best in Philippine contemporary art for 10 days with our partners all around the city!

10 DAYS OF ART
Feb 15 - 24, 2019
www.10DaysofArt.com

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10 Days of Art: The Midnight Milk
Feb
15
3:00 PM15:00

10 Days of Art: The Midnight Milk

Special Events | The Midnight Milk
Dulo MNL
Feb 16, 9PM | P. Guanzon St. Brgy. Poblacion, Makati

Come and join us as we welcome musicians from different regions of the Philippines to share the stage with usual suspects of Manila's music scene. Bands: Cali Island, Dayaw and Tarantella

Celebrate the best in Philippine contemporary art for 10 days with our partners all around the city!

10 DAYS OF ART
Feb 15 - 24, 2019
www.10DaysofArt.com

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Ayala Museum: Images of Nation: National Artists in the BPI Art Collection
Feb
12
to May 19

Ayala Museum: Images of Nation: National Artists in the BPI Art Collection

BPI Foundation brings together 14 National Artists in one art exhibit

Manila, Philippines – BPI Foundation and Ayala Museum celebrate Filipino artistry this National Arts Month with the launch of the ‘BPI: Images of Nation’ exhibit, which will showcase all-National Artist pieces from the Bank of the Philippine Islands’ (BPI) private art collection. The exhibit runs from February 12 to May 19, 2019, at the third-floor galleries of Ayala Museum.

“Since last year, BPI Foundation has been taking a more active role in supporting the flourishing local art scene,” shared Maricris San Diego, BPI Foundation Executive Director. “While this primarily entails the maintenance of BPI’s art collection, we believe our part also includes educating the public about art appreciation and inspiring creative talents through exhibits that demonstrate our cultural wealth.”

Fourteen of the 17 national artists are featured in the 45-pieced exhibit. The list includes Fernando Amorsolo, Carlos “Botong” Francisco, Napoleon Abueva, Victorio Edades, Vicente Manansala, Cesar Legaspi, Hernando Ocampo, Arturo Luz, J. Elizalde Navarro, Ang Kiukok, Jose Joya, Benedicto “BenCab” Cabrera, Abdulmari Asia Imao, and Federico Aguilar.

BPI Foundation’s third art exhibit is curated by Ayala Museum’s senior curator and conservation head, Ken Esguerra. The masterpieces are arranged to inspire thriving Filipino artists by identifying and idealizing the states and stages of Philippine nation as portrayed by the country’s National Artists.

“We are one with BPI Foundation in sharing the works of Filipino National Artists from their collection with the general public,” said Mariles Gustilo, Ayala Museum Director. “It gives us great pleasure to provide our guests a platform to experience the extraordinary vision and aesthetic excellence of our National Artists. Through this endeavor we aim to inspire pride in being Filipino.”

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Ayala Museum: Creative Nights: Gus Albor x CRWN
Feb
8
7:00 PM19:00

Ayala Museum: Creative Nights: Gus Albor x CRWN

Creative Nights: Gus Albor x CRWN
8 February 2019 | 7PM

In partnership with Bandwagon Philippines, we’re bringing together two artists from two different creative mediums in a live collaboration between art + music.

The first Creative Nights for 2019 will feature renowned minimalist artist (+ a musician himself) Gus Albor, together with beatmaker crwn!

Exhibit Access of Territory by Gus Albor
Music by CRWN
Art + Music Collaboration with Gus Albor x CRWN

Tickets:
P1500 VIP*
P600 Early Bird (until 1/20/19)
P700 Regular (after 1/20/19)
P900 Walk-Ins
P500 Ayala Museum Members & Partners

*VIP includes priority seating, meet and greet with the artists, an exhibit tour with our senior curator, and other exclusive offerings
**All ticket tiers include free access to Gus Albor’s exhibit, Territory.

Purchase Tickets through:
1. Ayala Museum Counter – Open from Tuesday-Saturday, 9AM-6PM. Reserve your tickets by calling 759 82 88 loc 8272.
2. TicketWorld – bit.ly/CreativeNightsBW (ticket prices are exclusive of service charges)

8 February 2019 | 7PM
Ayala Museum

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Ayala Museum: Pagbati Sa Hari: Komiks Pop-Up and Talks
Jan
26
9:00 AM09:00

Ayala Museum: Pagbati Sa Hari: Komiks Pop-Up and Talks

PAGBATI SA HARI
A Day of Komiks Pop-Ups and Talks

26 January 2019, Saturday
9AM – 6PM

We’re celebrating 100 Years of Komiks Legend, Francisco Coching, through a day of komiks love!

We’ve got pop-ups with komiks artists and their works, talks, activities, and more to get excited about. Stay tuned for more details!

+ FREE ADMISSION TO F.V. COCHING: KOMIKS AT KULTURA EXHIBITION

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Galerie Joaquin: Neo Conceptualism 2019
Jan
25
6:00 PM18:00

Galerie Joaquin: Neo Conceptualism 2019

Galerie Joaquin showcases the abstract masterpieces with works by Raul Isidro, Ombok Villamor, Aner Sebastian, Fitz Herrera, Marco Coching, Milmar Onal, Marge Organo, Perfecto Palero, Jay Ragma, Caress Banson, Kenneth John Montegrande, and Gary Custodio. Neo-Conceptualism 2019 will open with an Artist Reception on Wednesday, January 16 at 6PM.

The gallery is located on the 2nd Level of Phase 2, UP Town Center, Katipunan Ave, Diliman, Quezon City. For inquiries, contact Galerie Joaquin at (+63)2 247 1109 or email galeriejoaquin@gmail.com. Exhibit runs until January 25, 2019.

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Galerie Stephanie: In Private: Jerry Elizalde Navarro
Jan
19
to Jan 31

Galerie Stephanie: In Private: Jerry Elizalde Navarro

National Artist for painting Jerry Elizalde Navarro may not have the same recall now as many of his peers, like Bencab, Ang Kiukok, Jose Joya, Fernando Amorsolo, or Vicente Manansala, who, by their ubiquitous presence and prominence in the auction scene over the past decade, remain in the public consciousness. Instead, he occupies a more quiet place; mythic still, because of his prodigious output which are well-placed in private collections and museums, but rather impalpable to the general public, particularly the younger set of art collectors and connoisseurs. Yet this was not always the case. Navarro, in his lifetime, explored and excelled in various art fields. An elegant writer and poet, sculptor, graphic designer, and advertising maverick, he represented the Philippines in many international biennales for sculpture (Sao Paulo 1967, 1970,1972), and graphic design (Brno 1974, 1978) and participated in designing the Philippine pavilions in various world fairs and expos (1964 New York World Fair, 1975 Ocean Expo Japan, 1977 International Tokyo Trade Fair, 1979 Hamburg Trade Fair). His interdisciplinary practice; together with his wanderlust which landed him various grants, teaching positions, and exhibitions in Australia, the USA, Japan, and Indonesia; have made his works among the most elegant, cosmopolitan, and sophisticated among the Philippine artists of his time, vaulting his reputation as an artist, and garnering him the National Artist Award in 1999.

Galerie Stephanie, in its pursuit to provide excellent artists, presents “In Private: Jerry Elizalde Navarro“ an intimate exhibition which features thirteen works on paper composed of two collages, eight graphic works and illustrations, and four en plein air drawings; to provide an insight to the creative process of the genius that is Jerry Elizalde Navarro, and make him more accessible to the general public. In the various works which preoccupied the artist in his private time, we see how he mastered line, color, and composition, and gain insight into the themes and subjects which tickled his imagination.

 

Notes by Ricky Francisco

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Limbo: A Public Collection of the Hidden but Familiar
Jan
19
to Jan 20

Limbo: A Public Collection of the Hidden but Familiar

A Public Collection of the Hidden but Familiar

Accidental Intersections of Aesthetics and the Everyday

KRIS ARDEÑA
NICE BUENAVENTURA
LESLEY-ANNE CAO
JED ESCUETA
KOLOWN/Kolown
CZAR KRISTOFF/Laguna Daily
ALFRED MARASIGAN
MARK SALVATUS/Load Na Dito
SIDNEY VALDEZ
COSTANTINO ZICARELLI

Tropikalye exists to document overlooked and underrepresented Filipino cultures of the present day. These cultures are everything in between the realms of the indigenous and the socio-economic elite - a speculated post-folk gray area that evolved from a more homogenous and rural folk culture. Through its gathering and presentation of personal observations made about the community by the community, vernacular wisdom is not lost to the wind.

From a digital space, the Tropikalye online index is extended to a physical one through A Public Collection of the Hidden but Familiar. With the exhibition format’s narrative capacities, enhanced by the co-presence of object and visitor, a new curiosity about creativity in the margins of society is anticipated. Recognizing the potential contributions to wider cultural development, the project’s goal is to introduce ‘hidden but familiar’ ways of life into mainstream consciousness.

In its first staging, A Public Collection features work by Filipino artists taking cues from the vernacular landscape, providing an initial survey of what it means to live in tropical and postcolonial conditions.

Receptions starts at 6 pm, with music by DMAPS, ALYAS MORGUS and JO PARADIS!

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Galerie Stephanie: Noir
Jan
19
to Jan 31

Galerie Stephanie: Noir

NOIR, an exhibition of vintage monochromatic paintings by celebrated painter, printmaker, photographer, and textile designer Juvenal Sansó, will be on view at #GalerieStephanie from January 19 to 31, 2019.

It is in these acrylic works on paper that the technical mastery of Sansó is displayed with unabashed bravado. With no place to hide, the broad, energetic strokes mingle with the meticulous, intricate details; negative space balanced harmoniously between.

Do not miss this collection of 26 poetic and meditative black and white paintings on paper.

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West Gallery: Zer0s / Moments of Silence / maybe i'll tell you sometime / Attain Complete Emptiness
Jan
17
to Feb 16

West Gallery: Zer0s / Moments of Silence / maybe i'll tell you sometime / Attain Complete Emptiness

Opening Reception
17 January, Thursday, 6PM

Gallery 1
BEEJAY ESBER, DON DJERASSI DALMACIO, DARREL BALLESTEROS
Zer0s

Gallery 2
VERONICA PERALEJO:
Moments of Silence

Gallery 3
CLARENCE CHUN:
maybe i'll tell you sometime

Gallery 4
RAENA ABELLA:
Attain Complete Emptiness


Exhibitions run until February 16 2019

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Galleria Duemila: Monumental Works
Jan
15
to Feb 28

Galleria Duemila: Monumental Works

Vermont Coronel and Trek Valdizno’s works are on view at Galleria Duemila from Jan 15 to Feb 28, 2019. See the two monumental works at their magnanimity.

For more information, you may contact us at 831-9990 or 833-9815, or visit our website at www.galleriaduemila.com and follow us on our social media pages (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram): @galleriaduemila

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The Drawing Room: DONT SWEAT THE TECHNQ DOMNQ
Jan
12
to Feb 5

The Drawing Room: DONT SWEAT THE TECHNQ DOMNQ

The Drawing Room is proud to present

DONT
SWEAT
THE
TECHNQ
DOMNQ

Dominic Mangila

Portly Filipino ladyboys with miraculously small waists parade around the cobblestone streets of Brussels. They appropriate the colors and motifs of the paintings on the design of their outfits and accessories and perform fake voodoo rituals using symbolic objects that reference icons often depicted in contemporary Philippine paintings.

Posers and flirts they are, but not lazy bums

Opening 6pm, Saturday January 12
Exhibit runs from January 12 - February 5, 2019

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Silverlens: A Paradise Lost / Watchfire
Jan
12
to Feb 9

Silverlens: A Paradise Lost / Watchfire

A Paradise Lost
Ryan Villamael

SILVERLENS welcomes the new year with the show A Paradise Lost, Ryan Villamael’s 7th solo exhibition in the gallery. For this presentation, Villamael will premiere a new body of work that builds upon his ongoing dialogue with the contentious subject of Philippine History.

Villamael’s fascination with history began when he came across some early maps where the idea of ‘The Philippines’ first started to appear, which at that period could be seen as just a random scattering of nearby islands, with various tribes (warring and friendly) that were forced into a single, unified entity by an external power. This set forth more than three centuries of foreign rule that effectively dissolved all but a few links to our pre-colonial origins. For Villamael, this fraught relationship with history is a powerful driving force that sets fire to his nagging desire to read and know more, to dig deeper and sort through the entanglements of hearsay and facts, and from there begin to piece together a picture that may shed light to how we, as people, ended up where we are today.

With A Paradise Lost, Villamael returns to the intimacy of paper; hand cut, made intuitively and in isolation. Presented as a set of unfurled scrolls, which in total spans close to 20 meters stretched across the length of the gallery’s inner walls, the work evokes a faint horizon seen from a distance, a distance that it is keen to preserve. As even up close, it remains elusive; blank, still, and nearly empty. While ancient scrolls served as one of humanity’s earliest forms of editable record keeping, Villamael’s sheets remain thoroughly white yet not unmarked: it contains a thoughtful and evocative lament not written in ink but is encoded by blade. From his earliest works on, Villamael has employed the process of paper cutting to create images, confer stories and ask questions through the calculated use of negative space. Here he sliced and nibbled away slowly through the paper, creating a network of lines that mirrors how certain pests burrow and eat their way through old books, leaving a distinct pattern of holes, pathways and tunnels across the pages. And while images of hole-riddled pages and destroyed books carry with them the melancholy air of information forever lost, here they translate to the actual content that informs and cuts through the blankness of the page.

Still in another light, the patterns could just as well be seen as overgrown sprouts of wild vegetation, hopeful and alive as they creep their way up through the rubble of an unseen, perhaps fractured world below the horizon.


Watchfire
Jon Pettyjohn, Tessy Pettyjohn, Shozo Michikawa, Joey de Castro, Alvin Tan Teck Heng


SILVERLENS opens 2019 with Watchfire, a group exhibition that brings together five artists who have each made a critical contribution to the development of contemporary ceramics in Asia: Tessy Pettyjohn, Jon Pettyjohn, and Joey de Castro of the Philippines. Shozo Michikawa of Japan, and Alvin Tan Teck Heng of Singapore. 

For this exhibition, these five artists were invited to participate in an anagama wood firing at the studio of fellow ceramic artist Pablo Capati III. Each artist contributed to the kiln a number of works that had been formed and biscuit fired in their individual studios. Once the firing was underway, they then worked in shifts to stoke and watch over the fire until the process was complete. The works from this collective endeavor are exhibited in Watchfire, alongside a small number of works from the artists’ studios.

Incorporating work from an anagama firing collectively undertaken, Watchfire examines the role of both the individual and the collective in building a ceramic art scene in the Philippines that is collaborative yet independent, locally engaged yet highly international. Furthermore, this exhibition examines how the participating artists successfully balance collaborative action with their own individual artistic identities.

In the Philippines, working with clay demands a greater level of collaboration than other disciplines. Commercially made materials are harder to come by than in other parts of the world, so it makes sense to pool resources and share facilities. The culture of collectivism born of this necessity has resulted in productive and lasting working relationships within the ceramics community, and between the artists in this exhibition.

Collectivism in the Philippine ceramic art scene has paradoxically also created a certain degree of independence. The relationships born of this approach to art-making have seen Filipino ceramic artists forge their own international networks and opportunities independent of art world structures and hierarchies – a critical contribution to the Philippine art scene that is yet to be fully recognized.

While these artists work across a number of firing techniques, the ancient practice of anagama wood firing can be seen as the core collaborative endeavor that has facilitated, deepened, and sustained the relationships between them. The Philippines’ first anagama kiln was born of a collaborative act, when in 2000 the Japanese artist Shozo Michikawa helped Jon and Tessy Pettyjohn to build one at their studio in Laguna. Two years later Michikawa provided Capati with the plans for what was to become the country’s second anagama kiln. This marked the beginning of the Batangas ceramics studio, which is today an important site for wood firing in Asia and where the works in this exhibition were fired.

Anagama kilns are typically fired for a number of days, in order to reach and sustain temperatures high enough to melt the wood-ash circulating within, thereby creating a natural glaze. Firings are therefore collaborative endeavors, with multiple participants working in shifts to watch and stoke the fire. Each anagama kiln is its own beast and the firing process cannot be entrusted to the uninitiated. This means the usual suspects are regularly called upon; Filipino potter Joey de Castro has participated in countless firings at the studios of Capati and the Pettyjohns, while in recent years Singaporean artist Alvin Tan Teck Heng has frequently travelled to the Philippines to take part. When, in 2016, the Pettyjohns undertook a residency in Shigaraki, Japan, Capati and Teck Heng flew over to assist with the final wood firing. The anagama firing that took place for this exhibition is therefore emblematic of the practices and relationships that have shaped ceramics in the Philippines over the past two decades.

For any artist working in any discipline, collectivist approaches to art making come with a degree of risk, namely the loss of artistic identity. Sharing resources, techniques and facilities requires considerable self-confidence; it requires the firm belief that even if someone knows what you know and has what you have, they still can’t do what you do. While this exhibition considers the importance of collectivist approaches to art-making, it also demonstrates the strength of these artists as individuals, and their individual contributions in pushing the boundaries of contemporary ceramic art in the Philippines.

- Anna O’Loughlin and Mark Valenzuela

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Artinformal: Devoted / Improvised Exits / Lake Predicament
Jan
12
to Feb 9

Artinformal: Devoted / Improvised Exits / Lake Predicament

Artinformal Makati
Opening Jan 12 2019, 6PM
Exhibitions will run until Feb 09 2019


Devoted
Joel Vega


In his third solo exhibit, Joel Vega explores the rituals of grief and remembrance that borders on fetishism and nostalgia. Expanding his core materials of early 19th century portraits which are embroidered, combined or photo-transferred, to baked polymer clay, found objects, stitched puppets and boxes, the result is an intriguing treasure trove that is whimsical and emphatic. Devoted, ultimately, is a forthright exploration of memory and its links to sentiment, obsessive recall and personal devotion.


Improvised Exits
Gene Paul Martin


Gene Paul Martin’s genre-defying solo exhibit collides virtual excess with worldly ephemera collectively deemed as existence, deftly toggling between abstraction and representational devices to confound the mind and the eye from mere cognition, strongly creating undefinable worlds only imaginative painting could bring. Martin provides us a slipping glimpse of a world of interstitiality, a contemporaneous condition of everywhere and nowhere, inbetweenness, always beginning and never ending, entering and leaving at the same time, simultaneous, infinite. Improvised Exits is a paean to the impossibility of remaining human within a culture of systems and technology expressed consciensiously here through the distinct practice of painting, a so-called zombie medium using liquefied pigments modulated accordingly with mechanical yet random gestures on flat supports, an unpredictable conjuring and improvisation of the unknown, a triumphant exit from the chains of convention and the trap of compromise.

Words by Arvin Flores


Lake Predicament
Krista Nogueras


In her first solo exhibition, Krista Nogueras examines human responses through the cycle of “sensitization and desensitization.” Through ceramics and sculpture drawn from primordial forms, Nogueras attempts to create an environment where one becomes heavily sensitive to a specific situation; responding to a stimuli drawn from our perception of images. The artist devises predictable shifts in the emotional and bodily responses of the viewers and thus, allowing them to connect this total experience into how the mind and the body react to anxiety, forcing them to confront the trepidation and chaos through familiarity.

Words by Gwen Bautista

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