Galleria Duemila: six hundred and fifteen thousand four hundred and eighty eight
Nov
10
to Dec 29

Galleria Duemila: six hundred and fifteen thousand four hundred and eighty eight

six hundred and fifteen thousand four hundred and eighty eight
Maria Cruz

The new paintings shown in six hundred and fifteen thousand four hundred and eighty eight are a continuation of the project one million dollars which was exhibited at Artspace following her residency there in 2006.
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Maria Cruz’s abstraction is an aesthetic remembrance on the valuation and devaluation of coins, the intuitive process of putting color to the elements continuously and the modulation of documenting day-to-day works. Her process of tracing the outline of coins then rendering them with a transparent wash of colour is exorbitantly a trademark of Maria Cruz.
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The power of the circular element of coins is what we may call an ubiquitous concept of ‘having’, an existential challenge of acquiring properties to prove permanence, of making recollections to prove works eternal. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
A recipient of several exhibition and residency grants among them Institut fuer Auslandsbeziehungen in Germany; MOMA PS1 in New York City; Visual Arts and Crafts Board in Australia and joining over more than 50 solo and group exhibitions in Europe, Philippines, and Australia, Maria Cruz stages her next exhibition at Galleria Duemila adding to her one million dollar series. Exhibition will run from November 10 – December 29 2018 at 210 Loring St. 1300 Pasay City.

For more information, you may contact us at 831-9990 or 833-9815, or visit our website at www.galleriaduemila.com and follow us on our social media pages (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram): @galleriaduemila

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Artinformal: A View of Dawn in the Tropics / Somewhere, Anywhere / The Longest Night
Nov
17
to Dec 15

Artinformal: A View of Dawn in the Tropics / Somewhere, Anywhere / The Longest Night

LUIS ANTONIO SANTOS
ZEAN CABANGIS &
LENA COBANGBANG


Exhibition will run until Dec 15 2018.


A View of Dawn in the Tropics
Luis Antonio Santos


In “A View of Dawn in the Tropics,” artist Luis Santos explores the vital dynamic between image, place and history. Citing Cuban writer, screenwriter, and critic Guillermo Cabrera Infante and appropriating the title of his well-known novel, Santos draws on parallelisms between two similar histories – one is our own while the other, oddly enough, is a work of fiction. The artist’s impulse to act out complex processes on a specific image only reveals Santos’ understanding of its power. In this case, an image of a certain place could and must trigger remembrances of that place represented. In the artist’s brilliant take, it is possible for him to change gears and shift through ingenious and varied modes of reproducing images that make for reconstituted conclusions in different emotional ranges all the more possible.

Words by Jonathan Olazo


Somewhere, Anywhere
Zean Cabangis


Zean Cabangis continues his forays into being with his show “Somewhere, Anywhere.” Investigating locality as both a place and a non-place, Cabangis delves into the digital and the physical - how we are everywhere but also nowhere. He further examines this through his process wherein digital manipulation and actual painting is applied - depicting an era where everyone is lost and wants to go somewhere, albeit without knowing where they really want to be.


The Longest Night
Lena Cobangbang


During the winter solstice, nights are longer. Reykjavik in Iceland had only about 4 hours of sunlight on December 21, 2014. Most Scandinavian countries had similar dismal sun hours. In fictionalized Barrow, Alaska, the town is blanketed by snowstorms and a month of sunlessness turned the town into a virtual ghost town or rather a hunting ground for nocturnal hemovores.

Night is dark, dark is night, is void, is blankness, is blackness, is sleep, is repose, is listlessness, is lightlessness, of shadows long and short, of beasts under beds, of lurkers by windowsills, of uncertainties and fears, of velvet and silk, of transgressions and emissions, of terrors and tremors, of quietude and plenitude, of 40 wishes of a parallel existence, 40 versions encased in REM reveries.

Night in 1000 frames, in 1000 renditions of lightless skies, intercepted by glimpses of ineffable sparks of bright, night stretched and compressed as animated strobic pulses or as strips of black on a wall.

Words by Lena Cobangbang

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Silverlens: Painting Palettes/Palette Paintings II / ORDO AB CHAO
Nov
21
to Dec 22

Silverlens: Painting Palettes/Palette Paintings II / ORDO AB CHAO

Painting Palettes/Palette Paintings II
Elaine Roberto-Navas

SILVERLENS is set to end the year with Elaine Navas’ Painting Palettes/Palette Paintings II, her third solo exhibition with the gallery. A noted painter of waterscapes, forests, and gates, each piece is achieved through her signature use of impasto.

Previous exhibitions in Silverlens are Wet Paint (2010) and Salt Water (2016), featuring waterscapes. In this series of new works, Navas continues her Painting Palettes/Palette Paintings series that she began in 2014 on the recommendation of her teacher and mentor, conceptual artist, Roberto Chabet. The palettes Navas paints in this show are of artists Jan Balquin, Jose John Santos III, Pam Yan Santos, Ariel Navas, Yasmin Sison-Ching, Mauro Malang Santos, Manual Ocampo, and Patricia Perez Eustaquio.

The palette is testament to a painter's process, with every mark and trace chronicled on its surface. It knows the artist’s idiosyncrasies and proclivities when working --- the pauses and obsessions, the mundanity of the grind. It willingly abides to every mound of paint, every mixture and every erasure. Unmentioned, undeclared and cleansed at the end, the palette remains ready for the next series, ready to be used again.

It began as a dream by professor, mentor and confidant the late Roberto Chabet: a series of paintings of palettes. And Elaine Roberto-Navas happily obliged, first in 2014 then presently for the exhibition Painting Palettes/ Palette Paintings II. Each palette collected from friends and colleagues turn into artefacts that intimately embodies its possessor. With her signature impasto renderings, they are individually abstracted and interpreted, as though producing in the process portraits of the painters who provided them.

The levels of transference yielded --- from the palette’s ordinariness in the studio to paintings on canvases to framed articles --- blur the divisions between process and output, subject and object, personal and the public. It is then not the intent to be identified or to produce accurate depictions. It is not about the individual as much as a revelation of the techniques and methods of a painter.

The extraction of these items or unsung heroes* from the solitude of the studio instead acknowledges the liminal stages of production. It is a remembrance of a phase of no verdict, a space where freedom and exploration are of the essence.

*Term quoted from a conversation between Navas and Robert Langenegger.

- Iris Ferrer


ORDO AB CHAO
Yasmin Sison, Christina Quisumbing Ramilo, & Pam Yan Santos

SILVERLENS is pleased to present one of its two concluding shows of the year, ORDO AB CHAO, a three-woman exhibition by Yasmin Sison, Christina Quisumbing Ramilo, and Pam Yan Santos. Invited by Elaine Navas who is holding a solo exhibition simultaneously, it marks the first time these three artists featured in together in a Silverlens exhibition. Both Christina Quisumbing Ramilo and Yasmin Sison have held solo exhibitions in the gallery, The Domestic Life of Pictures (Sison, 2012) and Construct (Quisumbing Ramilo, 2013). This is the first time for Pam Yan Santos to show at the gallery. 

The exhibition features what the trio have in common – drawing out personal experiences to craft new meanings. It welcomes back Ramilo’s sensitive approach to material and site specificity, the recurrence of childhood elements in Sison’s works, and presents Yan Santos’ multi-layered pieces.  

ORDO AB CHAO (a Latin expression for ‘order out of chaos’ or ‘order from disorder’) explores the possibilities of the creative process while in the state of constant disarray. Chaos termed in physical and mental senses though may initially be seen as hindrances are recast into fuel and material for their works.

Acts of gathering and accumulating things are deeply ingrained into the artists’ quotidian lives. These are then incorporated into varying forms into the pieces that are produced. Layers upon layers of seemingly mismatched objects and imagery meld together to create abstracted objects, collages, installations and figurations as a manner of making sense that is rooted in their own understanding of how things function.

Mired within the contexts of the personal, especially with spaces bound within homes, a paradoxical merging ensues where this kind of intimacy becomes both boon and bane, privilege and drawback; it is clear that there seems to be no strict separation between the realities of life and of practice. This is then used as a start-off point for explorations and discussions, the seed for art to be concretized.

This transition from collected raw materials to actual work poses an evident cycle: a constant push and pull where the production process becomes meditation, refuge and catharsis --- a breathing space, an act of lifting one’s head out of the water. For the three artists, the art process turns into repeated attempts geared towards order whilst at the same time finding redemption in the clutter.

- Iris Ferrer

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Ayala Museum: Territory: Gus Albor – Works from 1969-2018
Nov
27
to Feb 10

Ayala Museum: Territory: Gus Albor – Works from 1969-2018

The largest exhibition of works from the leading Minimalist, featuring works on canvas, large-scale installations, and mixed media installations.

49 Years of Art: Gus Albor at the Ayala Museum

On November 27, 2018 the Ayala Museum will host an outstanding exhibition of the works from renowned Filipino minimalist artist Gus Albor. Entitled Territory, the exhibition showcases his body of work from 1969 – 2018.

It takes a second to get inspired, but it takes forever to get conceived images transformed and presented in a personal visual language.” – Gus Albor

Gus Albor, Born August 1948,  has been a stalwart of the Philippine art scene since the 1970s. A graduate of the University of the East School of Music and Fine Arts and a recipient of a British Council study grant to the West Surrey College of Fine Art, his works have been shown in exhibitions in Germany, Italy, Japan, France, and the United States to name a few. Albor has also received many honors and distinctions, one of which is the prestigious CCP 13 Artist Award.

The exhibition will be the biggest gathering of Gus Albor’s works, occupying two of the Ayala Museum’s galleries. Featured in Territory are oil on canvas paintings, mixed media works, paper-based illustrations, large-scale sculptures, and installation art works that manifests Albor’s distinct partiality for minimal color registers, with extreme subtlety, soft transitions, and muted harmonies.

Gathering close to two hundred works selected by the artist, the exhibition also displays a selection of figurative drawings which shows the artist’s range of cognitive, and tactile dissertations.

“The art of Albor had to surmount the pleasurable sensuous treatment of his canvases, his fine eye for the distinct subtleties of texture and light, sensitive to the stirrings of fluid pigment and the impulses of his hand.  While many abstract artists may contend that they are creating artworks as objects, Albor regards his paintings as emanations of his conviction and concepts, indeed an exposition of his existence.  “

– Cid Reyes, Immaterial: The Art of Gus Albor, 2010

On the exhibition Gus Albor says “I expect them to see the evolution and how I explore my field; how I explore and experiment. I would consider my show a confession.”

Territory: Gus Albor – Works from 1969-2018 will be on show starting 27 November 2018 and will be on view until 10 February 2019 at the Ground Floor and Third Floor Galleries of the Ayala Museum. For more information visit www.ayalamuseum.org or follow Ayala Museum on social media.

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Manila House: Seijaku
Dec
1
to Jan 17

Manila House: Seijaku

A unique collaboration between two formidable talents: the sculptor Ramon Orlina and multimedia artist Olivia d’Aboville. Curated by Ricky Francisco, the exhibition invites one to contemplate active tranquility.

The exhibit runs until January 17, 2019.

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Galerie Stephanie: Again / Ethos
Dec
1
to Dec 15

Galerie Stephanie: Again / Ethos

Again
Lyndon Maglalang


The process of learning lessons again and again is the main narrative in Lyndon Maglalang’s new works. The entirety of the exhibition is the entirety of Maglalang’s journey in art. Here in ‘Again’, he bares the essence of his works.

The whole space has been treated as if one is entering his studio. The audience is encouraged to view all of the pieces as a single entity, but to also look at each work as independent ones. Maglalang muses on the idea that despite doing different things and presenting artworks in seemingly different styles, all he’s doing is telling a story. Conversations with the artist allow for a deeper probing into the inner workings of each piece.

Working with a new method of production, Maglalang’s paintings utilize paint scraped off of old palettes to build images. The way he works is like doing collage. This method, according to him, doubles the effort needed to create the subjects of his compositions. The same effort intensifies the otherwise simplistic art.

The fleshy palette of the “Insight” series represents his struggles with worldly matters. The only things the audience can see in these paintings are a plain background, an image of a person, and a small patch of white paint. For this set of artworks, he intended to strip as much detail as he could, leaving only what is needed to communicate the idea that he wants to present. The end result is a series of works that give one a sense of boundless space—space that is silent and unforgiving. The subjects scream out loudly, in agony, in pleasure, in confusion. White paint signifies redemption; a belief that no matter how small, hope is always around the corner.

The main work is a polyptych. Entitled “To What End,” two large canvases and three supporting pieces have been used to present an interconnected story. Of the two large canvases, one shows an image of a person, disfigured and incomplete, set in a dull looking background; the other is an image of a seascape, with a vast expanse of the sky and the silently raging waves of the sea. The supporting artworks depict two abstracted designs: one made with collaging dried paint, and another using nails covered with clear coat. The last panel shows a smaller seascape. Again, all of these are recurring symbolisms in Maglalang’s work, they talk about overcoming obstacles, seeing things from a different perspective, and allowing the will of the one up high to prevail.

Aside from the paintings, the audience will be able to see various objects placed on top of a table. These serve as markers for the different processes that embody the various aspects of Maglalang’s art, from the beginning to the present. He intends to show a sense of nostalgia and an appreciation for the small things that tie together the whole. All of the methods he employs have been put out for the audience to see. Curled up steel wires, nails, and found objects are the inspiration to communicate his truth.

Again and again, the themes presented in Maglalang’s works are derivative of what he had been doing from the start; most of the time they’re simply expounded further or brought back as a reminder. All of these are, in essence, a revisiting—both of the good and bad events, and a vision of what he sees the future holds.

Notes by Jerome Destacamento


Ethos
Brent Sabas

Visual artist, illustrator, and art director Brent Sabas is known for his skillful illustrations that succinctly communicate complex ideas. After graduating cum laude from the University of the Philippines with a BFA major in Visual Communications, Brent joined the organization Ilustrador ng Kabataan, a group of artists committed to illustrating literature for children. At the same time, he managed to balance a steady career in advertising, becoming an art director at PC&V Comm, Publicis Manila, Ace Saatchi & Saatchi, and now at Over the Moon Comm.

After consistently honing his craft for ten years, Brent’s design and illustrations have been seeing growing success. Some of his notable accomplishments include his four published children’s books, the movie poster design for comedy film “Ang Babae sa Septic Tank 2,” and his regularly published editorial illustrations in magazines like Preview, Mega, and Esquire. Brent has been named one of “25 Creatives to Watch” by Real Living Magazine (2016), and a “Standout” by TEAM Mag (2016). With group exhibitions in Vinyl on Vinyl, Nova Gallery, and Sining Makiling Gallery, Brent now takes a big step in cementing his voice as a visual artist with the launch of his first solo exhibition “Ethos” at Galerie Stephanie.

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ArtistSpace: Shades of Green
Dec
6
to Dec 19

ArtistSpace: Shades of Green

Shades of Green
Raul Lebajo

See you at the opening reception of Raul Lebajo’s Shades of Green on December 6, 2018 (Thursday) at 6 PM at the ArtistSpace Gallery. An exhibition one year in the making, the highly anticipated show features a fresh view into the phantasmagorias and fantastic worlds fashioned by the prolific mind and dynamic brushwork of one of the most respected masters of his generation

The exhibit runs from December 6 - 19, 2018, 10am - 7pm

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Artinformal: Toggle: Engage-Disengage
Dec
8
to Jan 5

Artinformal: Toggle: Engage-Disengage

OPENING at Artinformal Greenhills, Dec 08 2018 at 6pm:

Toggle: Engage-Disengage
Jose Tence Ruiz and DengCoy Miel

Exhibition will run until Jan 12 2019!

Artinformal is pleased to present Toggle: Engage-Disengage, a two-man exhibit by Jose Tence Ruiz and acclaimed illustrator DengCoy Miel, opening on December 8, 2018, 6PM, at the gallery’s Greenhills location. The exhibit will run until January 5, 2019.

Curated by Tence Ruiz, the two artists will present new works in mixed media of a vascillating discourse between two different locations, scrutinizing the specifics of the past and the future of our agonized present. In this era of uber convenience where we toggle into an indifferent ambivalence, we find ourselves oscillating between the excesses which are now prevalent, as well as between the virtual and the real.

DengCoy Miel is a two-time Reuben Awardee for Cartooning. He is also editorial illustrator and designer for the Singapore Straits Times, The New York Times, and Philippine Star.

Jose Tence Ruiz is a multimedia artist, independent writer, and curator. He was Philippines representative to the 56th Venice Biennial in 2015.

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Provenance Art Gallery: Betsy Westendorp
Nov
15
1:00 PM13:00

Provenance Art Gallery: Betsy Westendorp

BETSY WESTENDORP for Provenance Art Gallery


MS. WESTENDORP’s Atmosferografias series, whether the large-scale or the more intimate depictions, has been described as “a glimpse of what the spirit can see. The spirit where imagination lies, unopposed by scientific fact...communicating by the instruments of a flat surface and a multitude of colored pigments.” Playing with light & shade, creating awesome works of art, there can only be one Betsy Westendorp. 


Visit us at the Shangri-La Hotel at the Fort. Call us at ‭+63 917 825 2041‬ or ‭(02) 946 3236‬. (Quoted from the ‘Betsy Westendorp’ book by Cid Reyes, also available at Provenance)

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MO_Space: ctrl +p / Levels/Layers
Nov
10
to Dec 9

MO_Space: ctrl +p / Levels/Layers

ctrl +p
Beejay Esber
Main Gallery

Snared by the endless and quotidian rhythms of the digital age, Beejay Esber’s ctrl +p mimics and demonstrates machine-like processes usual in today’s production while questioning the space and place of man’s will, choice, and control as it sits in the midst of this Sisyphean tragedy. The grind of the modern world ruled by the virtual barrage of information brings forth an amalgamation of images, words, and figures that fail to make connections—an irony where the convenience of linkages sacrifices senses of inquiry.

Esber takes off from his childhood when science fiction dominated popular culture, as he goes back comics, books, animations, and isometric forms from the 1980s and 1990s that are currently resurfacing today. The timbre of its colors carries with it its signature brightness, as though unencumbered by the burden of trend and mainstream following. Similar to the merging of seemingly disparate contrivances found on the internet, he also incorporates methods and characters found in Chinese and Japanese brush calligraphy, known for its precision. This is however subverted as ideas of perfection are disputed with every stroke of the brush that allows images to imperfectly flow on the canvas.

Perhaps the point is not merely to make sense than to gather and keep the question going. Capturing the sensation of being mired in a cyberworld, man’s position shifts from one who dictates to one who merely receives. He too has become an object in the time of automated dictations.


Levels/Layers
Jacob Lindo
Gallery 2

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Vinyl On Vinyl: Meet Me At The Gate / Two Over Two / Relative Judgement / Private Agenda, Hidden Property
Oct
23
4:30 PM16:30

Vinyl On Vinyl: Meet Me At The Gate / Two Over Two / Relative Judgement / Private Agenda, Hidden Property

Meet Me At The Gate
Bitto


Two Over Two
Ranelle Dial & Bembol De La Cruz


Relative Judgement
Dennis Bato & Jood Clarino


Private Agenda, Hidden Property
Van Tuico

Trespassing (Not) Allowed:

Private Agenda, Hidden Property by Van Tuico

In this suite of new works for the exhibition, Private Agenda, Hidden Property, Van Tuico quotes the signs—and signage—of contemporary life, as expressed through and by both the literal and figurative urban fabric: cement, asphalt, brick wall, warning sign, and most certainly the grid, which is the basis of painting and urban planning. Exposed, recognizable, and accessible, these slivers of the city are understood to belong in the public sphere, to be used and enjoyed by everyone.

These works, however, are fitted with steel matting, which establishes the barrier between the viewer and the piece. What is being presented is simultaneously being withheld. The steel matting gestures at the gates, fences, and any and all forms of demarcation drawing the line between the outside and the inside, between public and private. Its mere presence signifies that ownership is being asserted and that to peer through, to look past the border is tantamount to trespassing.

Just like how it is in the actual, day-to-day conduct of our lives, barriers paradoxically make what they are concealing more visible, igniting and drawing curiosity instead of thwarting it. A few may step back and move on but most of us will attempt to investigate as if to not assuage the desire to look harder becomes all the more intolerable. Barriers, such as in these works, may signify “protection,” a symbol “to keep one’s property safe and secure,” but they also provide the evident line to transgress. Vandalism, such as graffiti, becomes all the more irresistible exactly because it is forbidden.

Aside from bringing the viewer into an acute awareness of these lines, the artist also formalistically asks questions about the nature of perspective. Instead of providing a comfortable distance between the viewer and the work, the perspective in the pieces “distorts the view” and “disquiets the mind” as it eschews a sense of illusory depth, confronting the viewer with the materiality of the medium. While the works adhere to the tenets of abstraction, they signify not merely environments but a landing place to a vision that sees these paintings as continuities of the world.

Through a deft manipulation of materials, techniques, and the resulting perception, Private Agenda, Hidden Property revivifies our connection to the sights, sounds, and textures of the cityscape that has become so banal and repetitive in our everyday encounter with it. By denying immediate access to their subject matter, these works offer us the opportunity to see these continuities of the world with a new pair of eyes, charged with an inquisitiveness that we accord to things that are at once mysterious and equally elusive.

 - Carlomar Arcangel Daoana

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Leon Gallery International x Gagosian Gallery: Nam June Paik in Manila
Oct
22
to Nov 9

Leon Gallery International x Gagosian Gallery: Nam June Paik in Manila

  • Leon Gallery International (map)
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Catch the first Southeast Asian exhibition of works by the Korean-American 'father of video art' at León Gallery International in collaboration with Gagosian Gallery, which has represented the Nam June Paik estate since 2015.

Nam June Paik (1932 - 2006) was a visionary artist who foresaw the influence of the television screen and the internet not only on art but on the world at large. He was a classical musician who trained in Germany, eventually settled in New York City, but was first and foremost, a citizen of the world. Paik was an important member of the international avant-garde. He quickly and presciently grasped that advances in consumer technology were not fleeting oddities but would have a lasting impact on culture, sex and politics. He came up with the term “electronic superhighway” to express the many facets of multimedia artforms and communications and would give the word “installations” to his works. “Nam June Paik in Manila” will feature 25 pieces from 1983 to 2005, including several iconic objects that blur the lines between art and technology, the past and the future, philosophy, fame, and commercialism. There is “One Candle” with an analog-live candle ensconced in a tv casing and which will go on tour in 5 world museums as part of a major retrospective organized by Tate Modern and SF MOMA; “TV Buddha” has the Gautama contemplating his own image captured on closed-circuit tv.

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1335Mabini: Hermann Nitsch
Oct
20
to Nov 17

1335Mabini: Hermann Nitsch

1335MABINI is proud to present the solo exhibition The Orgies Mysteries Theatre by well-known artist Hermann Nitsch (1938, Vienna, Austria; nitsch.org). The artist is showing his works for the very first time in Southeast Asia. Nitsch recently celebrated his 80th birthday at his castle in Prinzendorf, Austria. Nitsch is one of the initiators of the confrontational Wiener Aktionismus (‘Viennese Actionism’), shunning the confines of traditional painting and sculpture, reinventing an art that exists in real, corporeal terms through long-durational performances called actions, during which audiences are not mere spectators but actual participants – participating in a celebration of life and of being placed in this world. The goal of such celebration is to experience life, to intoxicate being and to enter a mystic ecstatic condition. Nitsch’s poetic, dramatic performances are titled Das Orgien Mysterien Theater (‘The Orgies Mysteries Theatre’) and to experience the drama – and for the drama to be expanded to a celebration of life – not only sight but also the senses of taste and smell are called upon. For Nitsch, life is joy, it is celebration, exuberance and extravagance. Life – being placed in the world – is full of fertile ecstasy. Through his work, Nitsch seeks catharsis through compassion and agony. For his solo exhibition at 1335MABINI, Nitsch will show paintings and works on paper he created between 1987 and 2010.

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Finale Art File: Garage Ecstasy, Mutant Principles / Ligaw / Ang Kiukok
Oct
18
to Nov 8

Finale Art File: Garage Ecstasy, Mutant Principles / Ligaw / Ang Kiukok

Garage Ecstasy, Mutant Principles
Louie Cordero
Tall Gallery


Mutation follows its own arcane logic that we aren’t privy to. What we know is that it occurs in response to external stimuli, whether natural or radioactive. The results are unpredictable, and often only detected after the fact. As a natural force, it knows no laws, therefore there is nothing to defy.

This volatile temperament of mutation has been a recurring theme in Louie Cordero’s body of work, emerging in different forms: physiological deformities, moral contradictions, tragicomic narratives, and the triumphant glory arising out of the mundane. Garage Ecstasy, Mutant Principles embarks on a departure away from these narratives, into what is simultaneously industrial and fantastic.

After all, the tangibly mechanical isn’t immune from mutation. Metro Manila’s urban infrastructure and geography itself has spawned countless variations of vehicles. In Cordero’s town of Malabon alone, the automotive fauna are designed to resist rust and plow through murky water. The jeeps and village gates are stainless steel to resist rust, and the tricycles are elevated on sizable wheels. Because the coastal geography of the area makes the town prone to frequent flooding, folk engineering has adapted in kind to survive.

This series of Cordero’s works undergo their own trial by fire: sliced afresh from fiberglass, bathed in toxic paint, and scorched under one thousand two hundred watts of light. The lines converge and diverge, like coursing veins or electric wires. Behind each of these nine objects are the meticulous placement of color and forms, and stenciling executed with the precision of the surgeon. There’s a chronological order in which each shade is layered, accumulating like changes in genetic sequences. The result is homogenous, bearing a gleaming synthetic sheen. If you look closely enough, you might be able to see your own reflection.

Through the cracks in the molten concrete, signs of life persist and survive. Behind every streamlined procedure of a factory is a long process of trial and error backed by mudguard wisdom, kitsch sophistication, and junk yard engineering. Cordero has a distant fascination with the vernacular of public transport, built on a certain spirit of wit, kitsch, and earnestness executed by countless craftsmen and artisans. These images speed by, leaving spectral imprints like the kaleidoscopic visions that emerge behind closed eyes after staring at the sun.

True evolution originates outside of controlled environments, where different factors collide and coalesce in a neon primordial soup—not on a cold, sterile surface of a laboratory, but a garage with walls of hollow blocks. Mutation may run rogue, but it may as well be another word for adaptation.

—Mariah Reodica


Ligaw
Raffy Napay
Upstairs Gallery

Lush, complex, and expressionistic, this suite of large-scale works by Raffy T. Napay, one of this year’s recipients of Thirteen CCP Artists Awards. Invites us to glory and get lost in the charged almosphere of his visionary forest, in which mature is revealed as the untamed expansive force that it is, whose sense of order is generated from chaos and spontaneity. Such an exuberance of detail necessitates a multiplicity of media from oil slick, to acrylic to spray paint to appliques. and, of course, to Napay’s beloved threads-multi-variant, multi-colored, and manipulated into a variety of processes that include sewing, tufting, and braiding. The immediacy of Napay’s created world discloses the difficult, almost Herculean labor, The expenditure of energy becomes leaves, trellises, terns, flowers, and a wild variety of otherworldly Hora.

The power of Napay’s work is its ability to disengage our anchor, unmoor us, and usher us, with eyes wide open to the theater of his stupendous technique. There is no mistaking the work of the hand, but the narrative dream in which we are delivered as we get absorbed into his works is never compromised. We are made heirs to the teeming. bristling world dense with growth. blossoming, and phenomena, foregrounded by the Interlacing across the panels, which also presupposes their vital symbiotic relationships. Time and time again, we are enjoined to participate to an exhilarating profound kind of freedom (“ligaw.” in Mindoro from where his family hails, means Tree”) through the act of decentering. But as important, we are bestowed a lavish joy that Napay unconditionally affords us through the marvel of his unforgettable creation.

—Carlomar Arcangel


Ang Kiukok
Video Room

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Galerie Stephanie: International Contemporary Art Fest
Oct
18
to Nov 5

Galerie Stephanie: International Contemporary Art Fest

  • North Court, Powerplant Mall (map)
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Galerie Stephanie stages its first International Contemporary Art Fest as a celebration of the diversification and growth of international artists in the Philippines.

Since 2015, Galerie Stephanie has been welcoming foreign artists in the Philippines, beginning with UOB Painting of the Year Grand Prize winner for Southeast Asia, Anton Subiyanto from Indonesia. Eventually, the artist-in-residence program has constantly been an active annual project of the gallery, allowing its collectors and artists to have a view of the current multidisciplinary practices and have creative cultural exchanges from artists all around the world.

Part of the international roster are Galerie Stephanie’s past visiting-artists and artists-in-residence like three artists from Indonesia namely Roby Dwi Antono, Anton Subiyanto, and Imam Santoso, Noor Bahjat from Syria, Nunzio Paci from Italy, Cristina Gamon from Spain, and the current one being mixed media artist Morgan Rosskopf from the USA. The gallery will also be showing the artworks of Hideo Tanaka, a hyper realist artist from Japan, for the first time in the Philippines.

The gallery’s set of foreign artists present a characteristic variety of creative processes and philosophies. For instance, Cristina Gamon, the gallery’s first foreign abstract artist and artist-in-residence this 2018, utilizes her intelligent eye for color combinations and applies them on large acrylic sheets; while Noor Bahjat, a young Syrian artist based in Dubai, presents powerful expressionistic renderings to complement the overall collage outlook of her works. However, ICAF is also an avenue to show a comparative perspective of similar genres, like the hyper realistic figures done by Nunzio Paci and those done by Hideo Tanaka—both display incredible executions, but still coincidentally present cultural variation through their subjects.

Intricate mixed media artworks of Morgan Rosskopf will also be on display, giving the viewers a glimpse of her upcoming solo show with Galerie Stephanie this November 2018.

Although this exhibit is mostly comprised of foreign artists, Galerie Stephanie also included Filipino contemporary artists whose skills and techniques are of international caliber. These include Anton del Castillo and Reybert Ramos, who already began making noise in Southeast Asia through various prestigious art fairs; and Jone Sibugan and Kiko Capile, newcomers in the industry, but display immense potential through their distinctly surreal and poignant artworks. Included also are fast-rising contemporary artists Aileen Lanuza and Emman Acasio, both fresh from well-received solo shows in Galerie Stephanie this year.

Anton del Castillo, whose works has been exhibited in Beijing, Hong Kong, New York, Malaysia, Singapore, and Tokyo, lends his Biblically fuelled sculptures illuminated by modern ideals. Reybert Ramos, best known for his hyper realistic superimpositions of popular figures and human-dog hybrids, question the way we humanize things (in this instance, dogs) and how what it tells of society’s psyche. Both Reybert and Anton tap on socio-political aspects of humanity as major themes of their works.

On the other hand, the up-and-coming artists like Jone Sibugan and Kiko Capile, already capitalize their individual styles in making their mark in the industry: Jone’s particular use of mushrooms on his artworks amidst dystopian settings, and Kiko’s immensely detailed pen and ink illustrations of grotesque figures.

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Galleria Duemila: Sounds Like Home
Oct
13
to Nov 3

Galleria Duemila: Sounds Like Home

Sounds Like Home
Jay Ticar & Amy Aragon

In their recent exhibit at Galleria Duemila, Jay Ticar and Amy Aragon works on paintings that connect to the visual roots of sound art. The Vancouver-based artist couple articulates their response to this global interest through painterly abstractions and their ongoing theme of home.

Informed by ideas obtained through The 2017 Asia Center Fellowship held in 3 countries, the artists devised a creative structure that proposes a conversation on the non-musical aspect of sound art. They constructed house-like architectural models that are processed through the ideas of fragmentation and painting. This is to relate to abstraction and conceptualism as sound art fundamentals.

Jay Ticar and Amy Aragon has been exhibiting individually and as a tandem in respected venues and events of art here and abroad. After The University of the Philippines, Jay finished MFA at Tama Art University in Tokyo as Monbukagakusho scholar and Amy finished her post graduate program at Seneca College in Toronto. The couple is a combination of individual citations for their artistic practice. This includes being featured in publications, being Ateneo Art Awards finalists, and being recipient of Asian Public Intellectual Fellowship Awards to name a few.

Sounds Like Home will run from October 13 to November 3 at Galleria Duemila, 210 Loring St. 1300 Pasay City. For more information you may call us at +632 831 9990 (tel), +632 833 9815 (fax).

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Artinformal: Veronica Pee / Christina Quisimbing Ramilo / Mawen Ong
Oct
13
to Nov 10

Artinformal: Veronica Pee / Christina Quisimbing Ramilo / Mawen Ong

Veronica Pee
“even empty space is curved”; Veronica Pee will be showing a new series of objects as sculpture interpretations of the theory that space-time fabric holds the universe together.

Christina Quisumbing Ramilo
Verses Reverse speaks of futility and a general sense of disconnect and how the power / danger of speech and oral tradition that is referenced so much in biblical text resonates with the present milieu.

Mawen Ong
Mawen Ong’s solo exhibition ‘Coming into the Nearness of Distance’ is a journey towards a clearing space, a 'field of awareness', as described by Heidegger in his imaginary philosophical conversations on essentially what it means to be. This existential insight, which is also present in Buddhist thought, underscores much of Mawen’s photographic works. By layering and repeating images of her subject, she opens up a space where everything can be gathered and returned to its origin, in order to come to terms with itself.

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MO_Space: Nilo Ilarde / Cris Mora
Sep
29
to Oct 28

MO_Space: Nilo Ilarde / Cris Mora

What is to be done?
Nilo Ilarde

A gallery has become a space of sacred objects holding certain cultural sanctity. It has become a place where works of artists are consecrated and valued if deemed worthy of our veneration. In Nilo Ilarde’s "What is to be done?," he offers a counterpoint as he desecrates the walls and allows them to become his accomplices to reveal its own past and to reconstitute an apparent present. His collection of discarded art materials from other artists along with pile of scraps and remnants of past exhibitions are turned into showcased relics, placing question on their materiality and what have been born out of their existence. 

What is there to be done in art? – persists as an age-old question from people long gone and serves as a dialogue, a call to action to every contemporary artist. In Ilarde’s case, he refuses to be unafraid, to take the missteps and unearth the sacred art ground. As the proverb retold in Francis Bacon’s essay in 1625, “If the hill will not come to Mohamet, Mohamet will come to the hill.”

– leCruz


Sight Unseen
Cris Mora

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Galerie Stephanie: Criminal Lullabies
Sep
26
to Oct 10

Galerie Stephanie: Criminal Lullabies

This September 2018, the surreal worlds of two internationally awarded artists collide in the two-man exhibition “Criminal Lullabies” to be held at Galerie Stephanie. Roby Dwi Antono, the Indonesian pop surrealist whose collectors count Japanese contemporary artist Takashi Murakami and American fashion designer Jerry Lorenzo among its ranks, collaborates with Philippine neo-surrealist painter, poet, and performance artist Maxine Syjuco to explore their individual strains of style that find parallelisms in subverting expectations, finding light in darkness, and using children to depict truths of the world. “Criminal Lullabies” will have its Opening Reception on the 26th of September 2018 at six o’clock in the evening at Galerie Stephanie, 4/F Shangri-La Plaza, Mandaluyong.

The exhibition title, “Criminal Lullabies” calls attention to the dichotomies along which Roby and Maxine swing to and fro; Roby with his portraits of deceptively naïve children, and Maxine with her quest for the immortal soul in the gleaming interstice between emptiness and love. Largely set against a flat backdrop of flushed, dusty pinks and siennas, Roby Dwi Antono’s new series of works confronts the viewer with an unapologetic singularity of subject. Child-creatures armed with Godzilla, a crawfish claw, a toothy liver, take up the entirety of the picture plane, leaving little comfort from the girls’ bizarre, grotesque, yet strangely beautiful baggage. The large painting ‘Kinasih’(literally, ‘beloved’) is a highlight amongst Roby’s works, a blushing tableau overseen by a giant child-being transplanting its viscera into a translucent man-of-worship. As the only work in the series to establish a sense of scale, the world of ‘Kinasih’ translates unto the rest of Roby’s portraits, lending his iconography an almost religious gravitas. The microcosms Roby projects upon his canvases reflect the complex and playful lives ordinary objects lead in his head, as he merges popular significations with private reimaginings.

Maxine’s mixed media artworks on the other hand, fits vast emotional space into the intimacy of a stately living room, bedroom, hallway, and study. In composing the work, she layers together collages of photographs taken on her travels, of her niece as a child, and objects that strike an emotional chord. The series, aptly titled, ‘The Drowning Room’ alludes to the history of hurricanes in the Philippines which, until 2001, were only given female names. The flood waters symbolize a woman’s tumultuous emotions as they threaten to encompass and overtake the self. In the midst of the dreamlike deluge, Maxine inserts the faceless silhouette of a young girl, suspended from the torrent by a billowing white veil, or a lofty wing. For Maxine, “why we choose to love comes from an emptiness. In order to find light, you have to explore the dark.” Adversity is necessary in order to free the human soul; escaping from the depths further reveals truths that lie beneath the surface. The minute addition of the folder paper boat, intact in spite of the stormy seas, speaks of the strong yet quiet tenacity in the heart of each person.

An internationally known pop surrealist, Roby Dwi Antono’s rich visual language and polished style has propelled his artistic career to meteoric heights in a brief five years. Since then, Roby has exhibited at art fairs Bazaar Art Jakarta, Art Stage Singapore, Art Fair Tokyo, and Art Fair Philippines; and in Auguste Clown Gallery (Melbourne), Nick Allen Gallery (San Francsico), and Rotofugi Gallery (California). He has had four solo exhibitions in Yogyakarta, Jakarta, and Manila.

The daughter of avant-garde artists Cesare and Jean Marie Syjuco, Maxine is an Internationally awarded artist known for her poetry, photography, performance, and installation art. In 2017 Maxine was awarded the Magnum Editor’s Choice Award for photography, and in 2016 her album design for her art-rock band Jack of None bagged them the Independent Music Awards win for Best Album Art. Maxine’s exhibits have taken place locally and internationally, in prestigious institutions such as the Cultural Center of the Philippines, the Metropolitan Museum of Manila, the Tokiwa Museum of Japan, and the Art Takes Miami Exhibition in the US.

The two-man exhibition by Roby Dwi Antono and Maxine Syjuco, “Criminal Lullabies” will hold its Opening Reception on the 26th of September at 6 o’clock in the evening at Galerie Stephanie, located on the 4th Floor of Shangri-La Plaza, East Wing, Mandaluyong City. The exhibit will be open for all to view until October 10, 2018. For inquiries, call (02) 940-5726 or email inquiry.galeriestephanie@gmail.com.

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Tarzeer Pictures: Swoon
Sep
22
to Oct 26

Tarzeer Pictures: Swoon

Swoon is a survey of eight Filipino photographers on the trust and understanding forged between photographer and subject. For the ‘taking’ of an image charges a moment with a heightened sense of intimacy, each artist presents a series of new works that captures the unique ways photography can create, deepen, and reveal our most intimate connections.

Featuring works by:

John Eric Bico
Christine Chung
Regine David
James Lontoc
Ralph Mendoza
Renzo Navarro
Cenon Norial III & Mav Bernardo
Raymond Paredes

OPENING
SAT, 22 SEPT. / 6PM - 11PM
with Samantha Nicole

EXHIBITION RUNS
22 SEPT - 26 OCT
MON - SAT / 10AM - 7PM

2288 Chino Roces Ave. Ext.
Makati, Metro Manila
(next to Hyundai Showroom / parking is available.)

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West Gallery: Lines Compositions Patterns Repetitions / Botikang Walang Gamot / Eternally Up In The Air
Sep
20
to Oct 20

West Gallery: Lines Compositions Patterns Repetitions / Botikang Walang Gamot / Eternally Up In The Air

Lines Compositions Patterns Repetitions
Luis Lorenzana
Gallery 1 & 3


The second show since Luis Lorenzana’s intentional departure from the colorful, painterly style associated with most of his artistic career, Lines Compositions Patterns Repetitions marks the change in his point of view. Spanning two rooms, Lorenzana approaches the reframing of his practice in two ways, with both falling under a specificity of intention: to focus on the materiality of his chosen mediums.

In Gallery 1, he relies on the resulting precarity of color arrived at by the relationships between his chosen hues, The paintings are shaped by the muted selection, further killed by the introduction of a variation of greys. Although the figures may still be recognizable as those previously painted by Lorenzana — a familiar “style” of figuration, as it were — there is an underlying abstraction present in the compositions, further intensified by the insistence on the sombreness of colors, a visual exercise in restraint, and lines that delineate but also join each fragment together to create a whole. Each work is the result of different shapes and arbitrations joined together to evoke something specific through their varying configurations.

Lorenzana continues the conversation in Gallery 3, fully embracing the freedom and discomfort that comes with the exploration of unfamiliar territory. Spurred on by his encounters with ideas and readymades by artists such as Philip Guston, Chris Burden, Marcel Duchamp, and László Moholy-Nagy, he transposes these ideas to objects ubiquitous in a working Filipino’s everyday life.

The basahan or floor rugs sold along any street bank in the metropolis have a place in a common Filipino home, and in his second show of Lines, Lorenzana finds room for them, too. Irresistible in its obvious construction as a potential readymade, the basahan is both magical and beautiful in itself, a simple interlocking weaving that serves a purpose evokes a certain kind of nostalgia for those that grew up around such objects. Imbued with a particular character that Lorenzana was in search for, the slew of basahan he used are carefully selected and joined together, an attempt at making something as common as these objects seem new again.

The incorporation of LED signs into this series of work explores still ideas of repetition and familiarity. Nestled between the woven threads, the lights spell out names we may give to the work at hand. “Art,” some say in a steady and constant rhythm, and “sculpture” accompanies a wok covered with rugs while still retaining its shape. The inclusion of these signs mimic the act of naming, too: ascribing to an object — found and selected — something that renews and regenerates its character and its essence.

— Carina Santos


Botikang Walang Gamot
Doktor Karayom
Gallery 2

Doktor Karayom Write Up.jpg

Eternally Up In The Air
Kelli Maeshiro
Gallery 4

Kelli Maeshiro’s “Eternally Up in the Air” is a deep plunge into the pools of abstract painting that tread around the fringes of craft and design, while broaching the question of identity in the age of globalization.

Cropped in windows of azure fields awashed in subtle modalities of mood – an ambient impressionism for the digital age, these cloud-like formations by Maeshiro become fertile grounds for the intersection of memory and desire, material and simulation, tradition and the new. Ostensibly, the billowing vapor forms contract and expand on the picture surface that provide an experience of time progression and spatial depth, welcoming the entry of figurative information and relational imagery that might refer to a certain history, whether individual or cultural, or otherwise, with the mere randomness of signs to give way to the necessity of narrative. These widening universal grounds that Maeshiro provides in order to simulate a metaphysical encounter are foiled by varieties of artistic strategies, aforementioned is the introduction of recognizable figures and things, drawn and delineated like heavenly constellations high above where each connection made are attributed with a story of origins, Being, or a forecast of the future based on those relationships. We recognize bodies standing or waiting, in modes of transition, of traveling in-between stops, eternally up in the air: stories, data, profiles, uploaded and stored above the “cloud”, flowing through a global network of abstract currency. Besides these figurative fragments, appearing also are outlines of flora applied allover in design that break the representational reading with a stylized ornamental abstraction. Which carried further, functioning also as another foil in the seam of cloud simulacra, is the application of craft via soft edged curve-contoured paper and textile cutouts that push forward from the flat picture plane, as if bursting forth in Mannerist direction, giving the work a three dimensional presence to it. Nonetheless, the hybrid composition between surface and material gives the work another metaphor about transitional states which Maeshiro attributes as well to the contradiction and temporality of one’s being today. Color also becomes Maeshiro’s strength in presenting the shifts of mood and temperature, alongside the technical precision of her lines and swarming composition, in bringing the viewer to another time and place. The embrace of this warm saturation together with icy glints of blue across the picture creates the same comforts as seasonal environments, summers in the arctic, accessible pleasure on archive. In this series of ambient emotions, luxuriant design, and material play, Maeshiro confronts the paradox of modernist painting of remaining true to its medium specificity, of pushing paint so that it might appear something else without relinquishing its essential material, by way of abstraction, and by extension through craft – a critique of primary disciplines as “minor literature” in hand made creative production; while additionally producing a dynamic interaction between forms to create subjectivity, pleasure, and meaning.

— Arvin Flores

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