Galleria Duemila: Monumental Works
Jan
15
to Feb 28

Galleria Duemila: Monumental Works

Vermont Coronel and Trek Valdizno’s works are on view at Galleria Duemila from Jan 15 to Feb 28, 2019. See the two monumental works at their magnanimity.

For more information, you may contact us at 831-9990 or 833-9815, or visit our website at www.galleriaduemila.com and follow us on our social media pages (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram): @galleriaduemila

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Ayala Museum: Images of Nation: National Artists in the BPI Art Collection
Feb
12
to May 19

Ayala Museum: Images of Nation: National Artists in the BPI Art Collection

BPI Foundation brings together 14 National Artists in one art exhibit

Manila, Philippines – BPI Foundation and Ayala Museum celebrate Filipino artistry this National Arts Month with the launch of the ‘BPI: Images of Nation’ exhibit, which will showcase all-National Artist pieces from the Bank of the Philippine Islands’ (BPI) private art collection. The exhibit runs from February 12 to May 19, 2019, at the third-floor galleries of Ayala Museum.

“Since last year, BPI Foundation has been taking a more active role in supporting the flourishing local art scene,” shared Maricris San Diego, BPI Foundation Executive Director. “While this primarily entails the maintenance of BPI’s art collection, we believe our part also includes educating the public about art appreciation and inspiring creative talents through exhibits that demonstrate our cultural wealth.”

Fourteen of the 17 national artists are featured in the 45-pieced exhibit. The list includes Fernando Amorsolo, Carlos “Botong” Francisco, Napoleon Abueva, Victorio Edades, Vicente Manansala, Cesar Legaspi, Hernando Ocampo, Arturo Luz, J. Elizalde Navarro, Ang Kiukok, Jose Joya, Benedicto “BenCab” Cabrera, Abdulmari Asia Imao, and Federico Aguilar.

BPI Foundation’s third art exhibit is curated by Ayala Museum’s senior curator and conservation head, Ken Esguerra. The masterpieces are arranged to inspire thriving Filipino artists by identifying and idealizing the states and stages of Philippine nation as portrayed by the country’s National Artists.

“We are one with BPI Foundation in sharing the works of Filipino National Artists from their collection with the general public,” said Mariles Gustilo, Ayala Museum Director. “It gives us great pleasure to provide our guests a platform to experience the extraordinary vision and aesthetic excellence of our National Artists. Through this endeavor we aim to inspire pride in being Filipino.”

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10 Days of Art: Juxta: Position, The Aesthetics of Reduction
Feb
16
to Mar 2

10 Days of Art: Juxta: Position, The Aesthetics of Reduction

Exhibition Opening | Juxta: Position, The Aesthetics of Reduction
Asian Art: Future, 1335MABINI
Feb 16 - Mar 2, 4PM | 1335 Mabini Karrivin Plaza, Chino Roces Ave. Extension, Makati City

Celebrate the best in Philippine contemporary art for 10 days with our partners all around the city!

10 DAYS OF ART
Feb 15 - 24, 2019
www.10DaysofArt.com

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Art Fair Philippines 2019
Feb
22
to Feb 24

Art Fair Philippines 2019


ART FAIR PHILIPPINES 2019
22-24 February | 10am - 9pm
The Link, Ayala Center, Makati

Founded in 2013, Art Fair Philippines is the premier platform for exhibiting and selling the best in modern and contemporary Philippine visual art. The fair aims to mirror the vibrant local art scene and continue to generate support for Filipino art practitioners. Set in an alternative urban venue, Art Fair Philippines makes art accessible to enthusiasts and to those who want to discover one of Southeast Asia’s most exciting art landscapes.

Philippine Art Events, Inc. oversees the management of Art Fair Philippines.

The event is co-presented by Ayala Land, Bank of the Philippine Islands, Globe Platinum, and Julius Baer.

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10 Days of Art: The Ministry of Contemporary Art: Giorgio Guglielmino, AKA Italian Ambassador to the Philippines on Art
Feb
18
6:00 PM18:00

10 Days of Art: The Ministry of Contemporary Art: Giorgio Guglielmino, AKA Italian Ambassador to the Philippines on Art

Special Events | The Ministry of Contemporary Art: Giorgio Guglielmino, AKA Italian Ambassador to the Philippines on Art
Feb 18, 6PM | Manila House Private Members Club

The diplomat is also a writer. The author of several books on art, the latest being This is Now - A Geographical Guide to Cutting-Edge Contemporary Art (2013) talks about his abiding interest in contemporary art and how his diplomatic career has helped to cultivate this passion.

Guest: P500

Celebrate the best in Philippine contemporary art for 10 days with our partners all around the city!

10 DAYS OF ART
Feb 15 - 24, 2019
www.10DaysofArt.com

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10 Days of Art: The Midnight Milk
Feb
15
3:00 PM15:00

10 Days of Art: The Midnight Milk

Special Events | The Midnight Milk
Dulo MNL
Feb 16, 9PM | P. Guanzon St. Brgy. Poblacion, Makati

Come and join us as we welcome musicians from different regions of the Philippines to share the stage with usual suspects of Manila's music scene. Bands: Cali Island, Dayaw and Tarantella

Celebrate the best in Philippine contemporary art for 10 days with our partners all around the city!

10 DAYS OF ART
Feb 15 - 24, 2019
www.10DaysofArt.com

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Ayala Museum: Creative Nights: Gus Albor x CRWN
Feb
8
7:00 PM19:00

Ayala Museum: Creative Nights: Gus Albor x CRWN

Creative Nights: Gus Albor x CRWN
8 February 2019 | 7PM

In partnership with Bandwagon Philippines, we’re bringing together two artists from two different creative mediums in a live collaboration between art + music.

The first Creative Nights for 2019 will feature renowned minimalist artist (+ a musician himself) Gus Albor, together with beatmaker crwn!

Exhibit Access of Territory by Gus Albor
Music by CRWN
Art + Music Collaboration with Gus Albor x CRWN

Tickets:
P1500 VIP*
P600 Early Bird (until 1/20/19)
P700 Regular (after 1/20/19)
P900 Walk-Ins
P500 Ayala Museum Members & Partners

*VIP includes priority seating, meet and greet with the artists, an exhibit tour with our senior curator, and other exclusive offerings
**All ticket tiers include free access to Gus Albor’s exhibit, Territory.

Purchase Tickets through:
1. Ayala Museum Counter – Open from Tuesday-Saturday, 9AM-6PM. Reserve your tickets by calling 759 82 88 loc 8272.
2. TicketWorld – bit.ly/CreativeNightsBW (ticket prices are exclusive of service charges)

8 February 2019 | 7PM
Ayala Museum

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Ayala Museum: Pagbati Sa Hari: Komiks Pop-Up and Talks
Jan
26
9:00 AM09:00

Ayala Museum: Pagbati Sa Hari: Komiks Pop-Up and Talks

PAGBATI SA HARI
A Day of Komiks Pop-Ups and Talks

26 January 2019, Saturday
9AM – 6PM

We’re celebrating 100 Years of Komiks Legend, Francisco Coching, through a day of komiks love!

We’ve got pop-ups with komiks artists and their works, talks, activities, and more to get excited about. Stay tuned for more details!

+ FREE ADMISSION TO F.V. COCHING: KOMIKS AT KULTURA EXHIBITION

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Galerie Joaquin: Neo Conceptualism 2019
Jan
25
6:00 PM18:00

Galerie Joaquin: Neo Conceptualism 2019

Galerie Joaquin showcases the abstract masterpieces with works by Raul Isidro, Ombok Villamor, Aner Sebastian, Fitz Herrera, Marco Coching, Milmar Onal, Marge Organo, Perfecto Palero, Jay Ragma, Caress Banson, Kenneth John Montegrande, and Gary Custodio. Neo-Conceptualism 2019 will open with an Artist Reception on Wednesday, January 16 at 6PM.

The gallery is located on the 2nd Level of Phase 2, UP Town Center, Katipunan Ave, Diliman, Quezon City. For inquiries, contact Galerie Joaquin at (+63)2 247 1109 or email galeriejoaquin@gmail.com. Exhibit runs until January 25, 2019.

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Galerie Stephanie: In Private: Jerry Elizalde Navarro
Jan
19
to Jan 31

Galerie Stephanie: In Private: Jerry Elizalde Navarro

National Artist for painting Jerry Elizalde Navarro may not have the same recall now as many of his peers, like Bencab, Ang Kiukok, Jose Joya, Fernando Amorsolo, or Vicente Manansala, who, by their ubiquitous presence and prominence in the auction scene over the past decade, remain in the public consciousness. Instead, he occupies a more quiet place; mythic still, because of his prodigious output which are well-placed in private collections and museums, but rather impalpable to the general public, particularly the younger set of art collectors and connoisseurs. Yet this was not always the case. Navarro, in his lifetime, explored and excelled in various art fields. An elegant writer and poet, sculptor, graphic designer, and advertising maverick, he represented the Philippines in many international biennales for sculpture (Sao Paulo 1967, 1970,1972), and graphic design (Brno 1974, 1978) and participated in designing the Philippine pavilions in various world fairs and expos (1964 New York World Fair, 1975 Ocean Expo Japan, 1977 International Tokyo Trade Fair, 1979 Hamburg Trade Fair). His interdisciplinary practice; together with his wanderlust which landed him various grants, teaching positions, and exhibitions in Australia, the USA, Japan, and Indonesia; have made his works among the most elegant, cosmopolitan, and sophisticated among the Philippine artists of his time, vaulting his reputation as an artist, and garnering him the National Artist Award in 1999.

Galerie Stephanie, in its pursuit to provide excellent artists, presents “In Private: Jerry Elizalde Navarro“ an intimate exhibition which features thirteen works on paper composed of two collages, eight graphic works and illustrations, and four en plein air drawings; to provide an insight to the creative process of the genius that is Jerry Elizalde Navarro, and make him more accessible to the general public. In the various works which preoccupied the artist in his private time, we see how he mastered line, color, and composition, and gain insight into the themes and subjects which tickled his imagination.

 

Notes by Ricky Francisco

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Limbo: A Public Collection of the Hidden but Familiar
Jan
19
to Jan 20

Limbo: A Public Collection of the Hidden but Familiar

A Public Collection of the Hidden but Familiar

Accidental Intersections of Aesthetics and the Everyday

KRIS ARDEÑA
NICE BUENAVENTURA
LESLEY-ANNE CAO
JED ESCUETA
KOLOWN/Kolown
CZAR KRISTOFF/Laguna Daily
ALFRED MARASIGAN
MARK SALVATUS/Load Na Dito
SIDNEY VALDEZ
COSTANTINO ZICARELLI

Tropikalye exists to document overlooked and underrepresented Filipino cultures of the present day. These cultures are everything in between the realms of the indigenous and the socio-economic elite - a speculated post-folk gray area that evolved from a more homogenous and rural folk culture. Through its gathering and presentation of personal observations made about the community by the community, vernacular wisdom is not lost to the wind.

From a digital space, the Tropikalye online index is extended to a physical one through A Public Collection of the Hidden but Familiar. With the exhibition format’s narrative capacities, enhanced by the co-presence of object and visitor, a new curiosity about creativity in the margins of society is anticipated. Recognizing the potential contributions to wider cultural development, the project’s goal is to introduce ‘hidden but familiar’ ways of life into mainstream consciousness.

In its first staging, A Public Collection features work by Filipino artists taking cues from the vernacular landscape, providing an initial survey of what it means to live in tropical and postcolonial conditions.

Receptions starts at 6 pm, with music by DMAPS, ALYAS MORGUS and JO PARADIS!

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Galerie Stephanie: Noir
Jan
19
to Jan 31

Galerie Stephanie: Noir

NOIR, an exhibition of vintage monochromatic paintings by celebrated painter, printmaker, photographer, and textile designer Juvenal Sansó, will be on view at #GalerieStephanie from January 19 to 31, 2019.

It is in these acrylic works on paper that the technical mastery of Sansó is displayed with unabashed bravado. With no place to hide, the broad, energetic strokes mingle with the meticulous, intricate details; negative space balanced harmoniously between.

Do not miss this collection of 26 poetic and meditative black and white paintings on paper.

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West Gallery: Zer0s / Moments of Silence / maybe i'll tell you sometime / Attain Complete Emptiness
Jan
17
to Feb 16

West Gallery: Zer0s / Moments of Silence / maybe i'll tell you sometime / Attain Complete Emptiness

Opening Reception
17 January, Thursday, 6PM

Gallery 1
BEEJAY ESBER, DON DJERASSI DALMACIO, DARREL BALLESTEROS
Zer0s

Gallery 2
VERONICA PERALEJO:
Moments of Silence

Gallery 3
CLARENCE CHUN:
maybe i'll tell you sometime

Gallery 4
RAENA ABELLA:
Attain Complete Emptiness


Exhibitions run until February 16 2019

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The Drawing Room: DONT SWEAT THE TECHNQ DOMNQ
Jan
12
to Feb 5

The Drawing Room: DONT SWEAT THE TECHNQ DOMNQ

The Drawing Room is proud to present

DONT
SWEAT
THE
TECHNQ
DOMNQ

Dominic Mangila

Portly Filipino ladyboys with miraculously small waists parade around the cobblestone streets of Brussels. They appropriate the colors and motifs of the paintings on the design of their outfits and accessories and perform fake voodoo rituals using symbolic objects that reference icons often depicted in contemporary Philippine paintings.

Posers and flirts they are, but not lazy bums

Opening 6pm, Saturday January 12
Exhibit runs from January 12 - February 5, 2019

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Silverlens: A Paradise Lost / Watchfire
Jan
12
to Feb 9

Silverlens: A Paradise Lost / Watchfire

A Paradise Lost
Ryan Villamael

SILVERLENS welcomes the new year with the show A Paradise Lost, Ryan Villamael’s 7th solo exhibition in the gallery. For this presentation, Villamael will premiere a new body of work that builds upon his ongoing dialogue with the contentious subject of Philippine History.

Villamael’s fascination with history began when he came across some early maps where the idea of ‘The Philippines’ first started to appear, which at that period could be seen as just a random scattering of nearby islands, with various tribes (warring and friendly) that were forced into a single, unified entity by an external power. This set forth more than three centuries of foreign rule that effectively dissolved all but a few links to our pre-colonial origins. For Villamael, this fraught relationship with history is a powerful driving force that sets fire to his nagging desire to read and know more, to dig deeper and sort through the entanglements of hearsay and facts, and from there begin to piece together a picture that may shed light to how we, as people, ended up where we are today.

With A Paradise Lost, Villamael returns to the intimacy of paper; hand cut, made intuitively and in isolation. Presented as a set of unfurled scrolls, which in total spans close to 20 meters stretched across the length of the gallery’s inner walls, the work evokes a faint horizon seen from a distance, a distance that it is keen to preserve. As even up close, it remains elusive; blank, still, and nearly empty. While ancient scrolls served as one of humanity’s earliest forms of editable record keeping, Villamael’s sheets remain thoroughly white yet not unmarked: it contains a thoughtful and evocative lament not written in ink but is encoded by blade. From his earliest works on, Villamael has employed the process of paper cutting to create images, confer stories and ask questions through the calculated use of negative space. Here he sliced and nibbled away slowly through the paper, creating a network of lines that mirrors how certain pests burrow and eat their way through old books, leaving a distinct pattern of holes, pathways and tunnels across the pages. And while images of hole-riddled pages and destroyed books carry with them the melancholy air of information forever lost, here they translate to the actual content that informs and cuts through the blankness of the page.

Still in another light, the patterns could just as well be seen as overgrown sprouts of wild vegetation, hopeful and alive as they creep their way up through the rubble of an unseen, perhaps fractured world below the horizon.


Watchfire
Jon Pettyjohn, Tessy Pettyjohn, Shozo Michikawa, Joey de Castro, Alvin Tan Teck Heng


SILVERLENS opens 2019 with Watchfire, a group exhibition that brings together five artists who have each made a critical contribution to the development of contemporary ceramics in Asia: Tessy Pettyjohn, Jon Pettyjohn, and Joey de Castro of the Philippines. Shozo Michikawa of Japan, and Alvin Tan Teck Heng of Singapore. 

For this exhibition, these five artists were invited to participate in an anagama wood firing at the studio of fellow ceramic artist Pablo Capati III. Each artist contributed to the kiln a number of works that had been formed and biscuit fired in their individual studios. Once the firing was underway, they then worked in shifts to stoke and watch over the fire until the process was complete. The works from this collective endeavor are exhibited in Watchfire, alongside a small number of works from the artists’ studios.

Incorporating work from an anagama firing collectively undertaken, Watchfire examines the role of both the individual and the collective in building a ceramic art scene in the Philippines that is collaborative yet independent, locally engaged yet highly international. Furthermore, this exhibition examines how the participating artists successfully balance collaborative action with their own individual artistic identities.

In the Philippines, working with clay demands a greater level of collaboration than other disciplines. Commercially made materials are harder to come by than in other parts of the world, so it makes sense to pool resources and share facilities. The culture of collectivism born of this necessity has resulted in productive and lasting working relationships within the ceramics community, and between the artists in this exhibition.

Collectivism in the Philippine ceramic art scene has paradoxically also created a certain degree of independence. The relationships born of this approach to art-making have seen Filipino ceramic artists forge their own international networks and opportunities independent of art world structures and hierarchies – a critical contribution to the Philippine art scene that is yet to be fully recognized.

While these artists work across a number of firing techniques, the ancient practice of anagama wood firing can be seen as the core collaborative endeavor that has facilitated, deepened, and sustained the relationships between them. The Philippines’ first anagama kiln was born of a collaborative act, when in 2000 the Japanese artist Shozo Michikawa helped Jon and Tessy Pettyjohn to build one at their studio in Laguna. Two years later Michikawa provided Capati with the plans for what was to become the country’s second anagama kiln. This marked the beginning of the Batangas ceramics studio, which is today an important site for wood firing in Asia and where the works in this exhibition were fired.

Anagama kilns are typically fired for a number of days, in order to reach and sustain temperatures high enough to melt the wood-ash circulating within, thereby creating a natural glaze. Firings are therefore collaborative endeavors, with multiple participants working in shifts to watch and stoke the fire. Each anagama kiln is its own beast and the firing process cannot be entrusted to the uninitiated. This means the usual suspects are regularly called upon; Filipino potter Joey de Castro has participated in countless firings at the studios of Capati and the Pettyjohns, while in recent years Singaporean artist Alvin Tan Teck Heng has frequently travelled to the Philippines to take part. When, in 2016, the Pettyjohns undertook a residency in Shigaraki, Japan, Capati and Teck Heng flew over to assist with the final wood firing. The anagama firing that took place for this exhibition is therefore emblematic of the practices and relationships that have shaped ceramics in the Philippines over the past two decades.

For any artist working in any discipline, collectivist approaches to art making come with a degree of risk, namely the loss of artistic identity. Sharing resources, techniques and facilities requires considerable self-confidence; it requires the firm belief that even if someone knows what you know and has what you have, they still can’t do what you do. While this exhibition considers the importance of collectivist approaches to art-making, it also demonstrates the strength of these artists as individuals, and their individual contributions in pushing the boundaries of contemporary ceramic art in the Philippines.

- Anna O’Loughlin and Mark Valenzuela

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Artinformal: Devoted / Improvised Exits / Lake Predicament
Jan
12
to Feb 9

Artinformal: Devoted / Improvised Exits / Lake Predicament

Artinformal Makati
Opening Jan 12 2019, 6PM
Exhibitions will run until Feb 09 2019


Devoted
Joel Vega


In his third solo exhibit, Joel Vega explores the rituals of grief and remembrance that borders on fetishism and nostalgia. Expanding his core materials of early 19th century portraits which are embroidered, combined or photo-transferred, to baked polymer clay, found objects, stitched puppets and boxes, the result is an intriguing treasure trove that is whimsical and emphatic. Devoted, ultimately, is a forthright exploration of memory and its links to sentiment, obsessive recall and personal devotion.


Improvised Exits
Gene Paul Martin


Gene Paul Martin’s genre-defying solo exhibit collides virtual excess with worldly ephemera collectively deemed as existence, deftly toggling between abstraction and representational devices to confound the mind and the eye from mere cognition, strongly creating undefinable worlds only imaginative painting could bring. Martin provides us a slipping glimpse of a world of interstitiality, a contemporaneous condition of everywhere and nowhere, inbetweenness, always beginning and never ending, entering and leaving at the same time, simultaneous, infinite. Improvised Exits is a paean to the impossibility of remaining human within a culture of systems and technology expressed consciensiously here through the distinct practice of painting, a so-called zombie medium using liquefied pigments modulated accordingly with mechanical yet random gestures on flat supports, an unpredictable conjuring and improvisation of the unknown, a triumphant exit from the chains of convention and the trap of compromise.

Words by Arvin Flores


Lake Predicament
Krista Nogueras


In her first solo exhibition, Krista Nogueras examines human responses through the cycle of “sensitization and desensitization.” Through ceramics and sculpture drawn from primordial forms, Nogueras attempts to create an environment where one becomes heavily sensitive to a specific situation; responding to a stimuli drawn from our perception of images. The artist devises predictable shifts in the emotional and bodily responses of the viewers and thus, allowing them to connect this total experience into how the mind and the body react to anxiety, forcing them to confront the trepidation and chaos through familiarity.

Words by Gwen Bautista

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Artinformal: Toggle: Engage-Disengage
Dec
8
to Jan 5

Artinformal: Toggle: Engage-Disengage

OPENING at Artinformal Greenhills, Dec 08 2018 at 6pm:

Toggle: Engage-Disengage
Jose Tence Ruiz and DengCoy Miel

Exhibition will run until Jan 12 2019!

Artinformal is pleased to present Toggle: Engage-Disengage, a two-man exhibit by Jose Tence Ruiz and acclaimed illustrator DengCoy Miel, opening on December 8, 2018, 6PM, at the gallery’s Greenhills location. The exhibit will run until January 5, 2019.

Curated by Tence Ruiz, the two artists will present new works in mixed media of a vascillating discourse between two different locations, scrutinizing the specifics of the past and the future of our agonized present. In this era of uber convenience where we toggle into an indifferent ambivalence, we find ourselves oscillating between the excesses which are now prevalent, as well as between the virtual and the real.

DengCoy Miel is a two-time Reuben Awardee for Cartooning. He is also editorial illustrator and designer for the Singapore Straits Times, The New York Times, and Philippine Star.

Jose Tence Ruiz is a multimedia artist, independent writer, and curator. He was Philippines representative to the 56th Venice Biennial in 2015.

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ArtistSpace: Shades of Green
Dec
6
to Dec 19

ArtistSpace: Shades of Green

Shades of Green
Raul Lebajo

See you at the opening reception of Raul Lebajo’s Shades of Green on December 6, 2018 (Thursday) at 6 PM at the ArtistSpace Gallery. An exhibition one year in the making, the highly anticipated show features a fresh view into the phantasmagorias and fantastic worlds fashioned by the prolific mind and dynamic brushwork of one of the most respected masters of his generation

The exhibit runs from December 6 - 19, 2018, 10am - 7pm

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Galerie Stephanie: Again / Ethos
Dec
1
to Dec 15

Galerie Stephanie: Again / Ethos

Again
Lyndon Maglalang


The process of learning lessons again and again is the main narrative in Lyndon Maglalang’s new works. The entirety of the exhibition is the entirety of Maglalang’s journey in art. Here in ‘Again’, he bares the essence of his works.

The whole space has been treated as if one is entering his studio. The audience is encouraged to view all of the pieces as a single entity, but to also look at each work as independent ones. Maglalang muses on the idea that despite doing different things and presenting artworks in seemingly different styles, all he’s doing is telling a story. Conversations with the artist allow for a deeper probing into the inner workings of each piece.

Working with a new method of production, Maglalang’s paintings utilize paint scraped off of old palettes to build images. The way he works is like doing collage. This method, according to him, doubles the effort needed to create the subjects of his compositions. The same effort intensifies the otherwise simplistic art.

The fleshy palette of the “Insight” series represents his struggles with worldly matters. The only things the audience can see in these paintings are a plain background, an image of a person, and a small patch of white paint. For this set of artworks, he intended to strip as much detail as he could, leaving only what is needed to communicate the idea that he wants to present. The end result is a series of works that give one a sense of boundless space—space that is silent and unforgiving. The subjects scream out loudly, in agony, in pleasure, in confusion. White paint signifies redemption; a belief that no matter how small, hope is always around the corner.

The main work is a polyptych. Entitled “To What End,” two large canvases and three supporting pieces have been used to present an interconnected story. Of the two large canvases, one shows an image of a person, disfigured and incomplete, set in a dull looking background; the other is an image of a seascape, with a vast expanse of the sky and the silently raging waves of the sea. The supporting artworks depict two abstracted designs: one made with collaging dried paint, and another using nails covered with clear coat. The last panel shows a smaller seascape. Again, all of these are recurring symbolisms in Maglalang’s work, they talk about overcoming obstacles, seeing things from a different perspective, and allowing the will of the one up high to prevail.

Aside from the paintings, the audience will be able to see various objects placed on top of a table. These serve as markers for the different processes that embody the various aspects of Maglalang’s art, from the beginning to the present. He intends to show a sense of nostalgia and an appreciation for the small things that tie together the whole. All of the methods he employs have been put out for the audience to see. Curled up steel wires, nails, and found objects are the inspiration to communicate his truth.

Again and again, the themes presented in Maglalang’s works are derivative of what he had been doing from the start; most of the time they’re simply expounded further or brought back as a reminder. All of these are, in essence, a revisiting—both of the good and bad events, and a vision of what he sees the future holds.

Notes by Jerome Destacamento


Ethos
Brent Sabas

Visual artist, illustrator, and art director Brent Sabas is known for his skillful illustrations that succinctly communicate complex ideas. After graduating cum laude from the University of the Philippines with a BFA major in Visual Communications, Brent joined the organization Ilustrador ng Kabataan, a group of artists committed to illustrating literature for children. At the same time, he managed to balance a steady career in advertising, becoming an art director at PC&V Comm, Publicis Manila, Ace Saatchi & Saatchi, and now at Over the Moon Comm.

After consistently honing his craft for ten years, Brent’s design and illustrations have been seeing growing success. Some of his notable accomplishments include his four published children’s books, the movie poster design for comedy film “Ang Babae sa Septic Tank 2,” and his regularly published editorial illustrations in magazines like Preview, Mega, and Esquire. Brent has been named one of “25 Creatives to Watch” by Real Living Magazine (2016), and a “Standout” by TEAM Mag (2016). With group exhibitions in Vinyl on Vinyl, Nova Gallery, and Sining Makiling Gallery, Brent now takes a big step in cementing his voice as a visual artist with the launch of his first solo exhibition “Ethos” at Galerie Stephanie.

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Manila House: Seijaku
Dec
1
to Jan 17

Manila House: Seijaku

A unique collaboration between two formidable talents: the sculptor Ramon Orlina and multimedia artist Olivia d’Aboville. Curated by Ricky Francisco, the exhibition invites one to contemplate active tranquility.

The exhibit runs until January 17, 2019.

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Ayala Museum: Territory: Gus Albor – Works from 1969-2018
Nov
27
to Feb 10

Ayala Museum: Territory: Gus Albor – Works from 1969-2018

The largest exhibition of works from the leading Minimalist, featuring works on canvas, large-scale installations, and mixed media installations.

49 Years of Art: Gus Albor at the Ayala Museum

On November 27, 2018 the Ayala Museum will host an outstanding exhibition of the works from renowned Filipino minimalist artist Gus Albor. Entitled Territory, the exhibition showcases his body of work from 1969 – 2018.

It takes a second to get inspired, but it takes forever to get conceived images transformed and presented in a personal visual language.” – Gus Albor

Gus Albor, Born August 1948,  has been a stalwart of the Philippine art scene since the 1970s. A graduate of the University of the East School of Music and Fine Arts and a recipient of a British Council study grant to the West Surrey College of Fine Art, his works have been shown in exhibitions in Germany, Italy, Japan, France, and the United States to name a few. Albor has also received many honors and distinctions, one of which is the prestigious CCP 13 Artist Award.

The exhibition will be the biggest gathering of Gus Albor’s works, occupying two of the Ayala Museum’s galleries. Featured in Territory are oil on canvas paintings, mixed media works, paper-based illustrations, large-scale sculptures, and installation art works that manifests Albor’s distinct partiality for minimal color registers, with extreme subtlety, soft transitions, and muted harmonies.

Gathering close to two hundred works selected by the artist, the exhibition also displays a selection of figurative drawings which shows the artist’s range of cognitive, and tactile dissertations.

“The art of Albor had to surmount the pleasurable sensuous treatment of his canvases, his fine eye for the distinct subtleties of texture and light, sensitive to the stirrings of fluid pigment and the impulses of his hand.  While many abstract artists may contend that they are creating artworks as objects, Albor regards his paintings as emanations of his conviction and concepts, indeed an exposition of his existence.  “

– Cid Reyes, Immaterial: The Art of Gus Albor, 2010

On the exhibition Gus Albor says “I expect them to see the evolution and how I explore my field; how I explore and experiment. I would consider my show a confession.”

Territory: Gus Albor – Works from 1969-2018 will be on show starting 27 November 2018 and will be on view until 10 February 2019 at the Ground Floor and Third Floor Galleries of the Ayala Museum. For more information visit www.ayalamuseum.org or follow Ayala Museum on social media.

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Silverlens: Painting Palettes/Palette Paintings II / ORDO AB CHAO
Nov
21
to Dec 22

Silverlens: Painting Palettes/Palette Paintings II / ORDO AB CHAO

Painting Palettes/Palette Paintings II
Elaine Roberto-Navas

SILVERLENS is set to end the year with Elaine Navas’ Painting Palettes/Palette Paintings II, her third solo exhibition with the gallery. A noted painter of waterscapes, forests, and gates, each piece is achieved through her signature use of impasto.

Previous exhibitions in Silverlens are Wet Paint (2010) and Salt Water (2016), featuring waterscapes. In this series of new works, Navas continues her Painting Palettes/Palette Paintings series that she began in 2014 on the recommendation of her teacher and mentor, conceptual artist, Roberto Chabet. The palettes Navas paints in this show are of artists Jan Balquin, Jose John Santos III, Pam Yan Santos, Ariel Navas, Yasmin Sison-Ching, Mauro Malang Santos, Manual Ocampo, and Patricia Perez Eustaquio.

The palette is testament to a painter's process, with every mark and trace chronicled on its surface. It knows the artist’s idiosyncrasies and proclivities when working --- the pauses and obsessions, the mundanity of the grind. It willingly abides to every mound of paint, every mixture and every erasure. Unmentioned, undeclared and cleansed at the end, the palette remains ready for the next series, ready to be used again.

It began as a dream by professor, mentor and confidant the late Roberto Chabet: a series of paintings of palettes. And Elaine Roberto-Navas happily obliged, first in 2014 then presently for the exhibition Painting Palettes/ Palette Paintings II. Each palette collected from friends and colleagues turn into artefacts that intimately embodies its possessor. With her signature impasto renderings, they are individually abstracted and interpreted, as though producing in the process portraits of the painters who provided them.

The levels of transference yielded --- from the palette’s ordinariness in the studio to paintings on canvases to framed articles --- blur the divisions between process and output, subject and object, personal and the public. It is then not the intent to be identified or to produce accurate depictions. It is not about the individual as much as a revelation of the techniques and methods of a painter.

The extraction of these items or unsung heroes* from the solitude of the studio instead acknowledges the liminal stages of production. It is a remembrance of a phase of no verdict, a space where freedom and exploration are of the essence.

*Term quoted from a conversation between Navas and Robert Langenegger.

- Iris Ferrer


ORDO AB CHAO
Yasmin Sison, Christina Quisumbing Ramilo, & Pam Yan Santos

SILVERLENS is pleased to present one of its two concluding shows of the year, ORDO AB CHAO, a three-woman exhibition by Yasmin Sison, Christina Quisumbing Ramilo, and Pam Yan Santos. Invited by Elaine Navas who is holding a solo exhibition simultaneously, it marks the first time these three artists featured in together in a Silverlens exhibition. Both Christina Quisumbing Ramilo and Yasmin Sison have held solo exhibitions in the gallery, The Domestic Life of Pictures (Sison, 2012) and Construct (Quisumbing Ramilo, 2013). This is the first time for Pam Yan Santos to show at the gallery. 

The exhibition features what the trio have in common – drawing out personal experiences to craft new meanings. It welcomes back Ramilo’s sensitive approach to material and site specificity, the recurrence of childhood elements in Sison’s works, and presents Yan Santos’ multi-layered pieces.  

ORDO AB CHAO (a Latin expression for ‘order out of chaos’ or ‘order from disorder’) explores the possibilities of the creative process while in the state of constant disarray. Chaos termed in physical and mental senses though may initially be seen as hindrances are recast into fuel and material for their works.

Acts of gathering and accumulating things are deeply ingrained into the artists’ quotidian lives. These are then incorporated into varying forms into the pieces that are produced. Layers upon layers of seemingly mismatched objects and imagery meld together to create abstracted objects, collages, installations and figurations as a manner of making sense that is rooted in their own understanding of how things function.

Mired within the contexts of the personal, especially with spaces bound within homes, a paradoxical merging ensues where this kind of intimacy becomes both boon and bane, privilege and drawback; it is clear that there seems to be no strict separation between the realities of life and of practice. This is then used as a start-off point for explorations and discussions, the seed for art to be concretized.

This transition from collected raw materials to actual work poses an evident cycle: a constant push and pull where the production process becomes meditation, refuge and catharsis --- a breathing space, an act of lifting one’s head out of the water. For the three artists, the art process turns into repeated attempts geared towards order whilst at the same time finding redemption in the clutter.

- Iris Ferrer

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Artinformal: A View of Dawn in the Tropics / Somewhere, Anywhere / The Longest Night
Nov
17
to Dec 15

Artinformal: A View of Dawn in the Tropics / Somewhere, Anywhere / The Longest Night

LUIS ANTONIO SANTOS
ZEAN CABANGIS &
LENA COBANGBANG


Exhibition will run until Dec 15 2018.


A View of Dawn in the Tropics
Luis Antonio Santos


In “A View of Dawn in the Tropics,” artist Luis Santos explores the vital dynamic between image, place and history. Citing Cuban writer, screenwriter, and critic Guillermo Cabrera Infante and appropriating the title of his well-known novel, Santos draws on parallelisms between two similar histories – one is our own while the other, oddly enough, is a work of fiction. The artist’s impulse to act out complex processes on a specific image only reveals Santos’ understanding of its power. In this case, an image of a certain place could and must trigger remembrances of that place represented. In the artist’s brilliant take, it is possible for him to change gears and shift through ingenious and varied modes of reproducing images that make for reconstituted conclusions in different emotional ranges all the more possible.

Words by Jonathan Olazo


Somewhere, Anywhere
Zean Cabangis


Zean Cabangis continues his forays into being with his show “Somewhere, Anywhere.” Investigating locality as both a place and a non-place, Cabangis delves into the digital and the physical - how we are everywhere but also nowhere. He further examines this through his process wherein digital manipulation and actual painting is applied - depicting an era where everyone is lost and wants to go somewhere, albeit without knowing where they really want to be.


The Longest Night
Lena Cobangbang


During the winter solstice, nights are longer. Reykjavik in Iceland had only about 4 hours of sunlight on December 21, 2014. Most Scandinavian countries had similar dismal sun hours. In fictionalized Barrow, Alaska, the town is blanketed by snowstorms and a month of sunlessness turned the town into a virtual ghost town or rather a hunting ground for nocturnal hemovores.

Night is dark, dark is night, is void, is blankness, is blackness, is sleep, is repose, is listlessness, is lightlessness, of shadows long and short, of beasts under beds, of lurkers by windowsills, of uncertainties and fears, of velvet and silk, of transgressions and emissions, of terrors and tremors, of quietude and plenitude, of 40 wishes of a parallel existence, 40 versions encased in REM reveries.

Night in 1000 frames, in 1000 renditions of lightless skies, intercepted by glimpses of ineffable sparks of bright, night stretched and compressed as animated strobic pulses or as strips of black on a wall.

Words by Lena Cobangbang

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Provenance Art Gallery: Betsy Westendorp
Nov
15
1:00 PM13:00

Provenance Art Gallery: Betsy Westendorp

BETSY WESTENDORP for Provenance Art Gallery


MS. WESTENDORP’s Atmosferografias series, whether the large-scale or the more intimate depictions, has been described as “a glimpse of what the spirit can see. The spirit where imagination lies, unopposed by scientific fact...communicating by the instruments of a flat surface and a multitude of colored pigments.” Playing with light & shade, creating awesome works of art, there can only be one Betsy Westendorp. 


Visit us at the Shangri-La Hotel at the Fort. Call us at ‭+63 917 825 2041‬ or ‭(02) 946 3236‬. (Quoted from the ‘Betsy Westendorp’ book by Cid Reyes, also available at Provenance)

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